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This American Moment: Jorge Ramos

This American Moment: Jorge Ramos

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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News anchor Jorge Ramos in 2002. J. Emilio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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J. Emilio Flores/Getty Images

Anybody familiar with Spanish-speaking households knows that Jorge Ramos is synonymous with the nightly news. Since 1985, when he first appeared as a young, scrawny correspondent on Noticiero Univision — Univision's nightly news — millions of Latinos in the US have grown familiar with his Mexico City-accented Spanish. Along with co-anchor Maria Elena Salinas, via satellite he is beamed into to Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean and of course, across the US. Combined, his reach in the American continent is in the millions. Ramos has talked to all of the controversial heads of state in Latin America — think Evo , Hugo, Fidel. In the US, presidential candidates, former US presidents, and lawmakers know that an interview with Ramos is key to reaching the Latino voting bloc. As part of our series of conversations about the campaign season we call "This American Moment," today, we hear from Jorge Ramos about what this election means to him and US Latinos. And we'd like to reach out to Latino listeners: Tell us, what does this political season mean to you?

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