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<em>TOTN</em> Summer Movie Series: How I Started REALLY Worrying About The Bomb

TOTN Summer Movie Series: How I Started REALLY Worrying About The Bomb

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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There's really no plot device like the Bomb. It can end things summarily, move the plot along, or in some post-apocalyptic cases, start things up. I'll admit, I was skeptical when I started producing this week's summer movies spectacular, but it turns out that not only do I love most of these films, but I'm deathly afraid of the Bomb. (And it's not a great week for this sort of thing — given the Russians have had a big week.) In any case, I'd like to keep writing, but if I go into detail about all the terrifying stuff I've seen while pulling tape — several cities destroyed, faces melting, giant locusts, Godzilla — I'll have to duck and cover again. In lieu of that, enjoy the amazing clip from On The Beach (1954), below. Anthony Perkins giving instructions to his young wife on how to kill herself — and their baby! — when the radiation poisoning sets in.