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Whose News?

Whose News?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Sen. Barack Obama's run for the White House has kept race in the headlines like few other news events have, and it raises some questions for journalists about covering his campaign. Specifically, how does a black journalist cover Obama in a positive light without seeming like an advocate, and how does a white journalist criticize Obama and avoid accusations of racism? Try as they might, everyone's a critic, and race can be especially tricky. And then there's that grey area between intention and perception — even if a writer intends to pen a balanced piece, if the readers disagree, they'll be taken to task. So as consumers of news in this political cycle, I want to know: When you read pieces about the candidate — be they pro or con — do you wonder about the race of the writer? Furthermore, do you trust some reporters more — or less — because of their race?

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