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Desperately Seeking Osama

Desperately Seeking Osama

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The United States suspects Osama bin Laden is hiding in the mountainous tribal regions of Pakistan. Photo by John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Photo by John Moore/Getty Images

American special ops forces reportedly crossed into Pakistan's tribal regions along the Afghan border yesterday. It's the first time a U.S. official has confirmed, though anonymously, any operations inside Pakistan, and reports today indicate it may not be the last. Needless to say, Pakistan is furious. And while we have no idea who or what was targeted in the raid, some guess that it must have been big to justify alienating an ally in the the war on terror.

Could it be a lead on Osama bin Laden? Will it help cut down on attacks on U.S. and NATO troops? Or hurt Al-Qaida? Will it do anything to help stabilize Afghanistan, or destabilize Pakistan? Who knows. Now seven years after 9/11, do you think finding bin Laden is still priority #1? Should it be?

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