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Gustav Aftermath

Gustav Aftermath

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Baton Rouge, LA after Gustav hit. Source: Butterbean Man hide caption

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Source: Butterbean Man

Yesterday, Hurricane Gustav, which is now being called a "tropical depression," tore through the Gulf Coast. The levees in New Orleans were tested but survived, and residents can't return home until later in the week. Other cities, however, weren't as lucky. Today, we'll talk to a reporter from Baton Rouge, where, so far, the death toll is 2, and there's no electricity. In what many are calling "ground zero" of the storm, Houma, Louisiana, trees block major roads, power lines are down, and I have it on good authority that many reporters from the Houma Daily Courier are living, literally, in the newsroom. And, in Plaquemines Parish, levees overtopped from heavy rains, and flooding threatens homes.

We want to hear from Gulf Coast residents — how did you weather the storm, and what kind of damage was done?