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Hold On To Your Dignity...er Hat!

Hold On To Your Dignity...er Hat!

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/94236531/94238980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

There is, I've found, no bad mood of mine that cannot be solved by watching this piece of hurricane coverage.

Just THINKING of this clip makes me belly laugh — SNORT, even. But folks, this is not the only piece of weather reporting that can make your own gray clouds disappear. Hurricane Gustav — which thankfully didn't match expectations — afforded laughs aplenty.

So — why does weather journalism have to happen outside? It seems like hypocrisy to have these people with nothing but their CNN windbreakers between them and disaster — railing about how dangerous it is for viewers to venture outside. Paul Farhi commented on the irony in the Post's Style section yesterday — and we've got a special guest (hint: he rhymes with that's AMORE) to tell us what's it like to stand up during a hurricane standup. All in all — I love these reporters — they blow nicely (so to speak).

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