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I Can't Quit You, Google

I Can't Quit You, Google

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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If you spend any substantial amount of time on the Internet, I'm willing to bet some portion of that time you're Googling. I know I am — fact-checking, finding cool links for blog posts, looking up restaurants for tonight's reservations... and then switching over to Google Maps to figure out how to get there, then back to the image search to figure out what attire might be appropriate, and finish things up with a quick Gchat to confirm my plans with my friends. This isn't meant to be an ad for Google — it's just so darn useful, that I tend to think of it as more of a utility, like water and electricity, than a commercial product... Which, I'm sure, is exactly what they want! Anyway, I'm not alone, not by a long shot. Google turned 10 yesterday, and to celebrate, Colbert Report writer Rob Dubbin, who can hardly imagine life without Google ("When I am at work, trying to find the Inuit word for "hat," and Google tells me the answer is "Nasak," I accept this as "likely true" and move on with my life; ten years ago, I don't know what I would have done. Probably married an Inuit."), decides to take a day off, cold-turkey. His chronicle of that day is hilarious, and a little gross, and he joins us today to regale us. Could you take a day off of Google?

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