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In-Flight Superwomen (And Men)

In-Flight Superwomen (And Men)

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Flight attendants on the job. Source: Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Here at TOTN, we're about to rack up some serious frequent flier miles because of remote broadcasts in Phoenix, Columbus and Athens, and St. Louis. And though we're all generally shining examples of glowing positivity around here, odds are, at least a few of us will come away from the tarmac with horror stories and complaints. Imagine, for a minute, the flight attendants on these flights. The ones who must manage the complaints from middle-seaters, "water" the drunk and demanding gentleman in 4B, deny food to the famished, and jam their overworked behinds into tiny little jumpseats, all for around $34,000 a year. Travel writer Michelle Higgins wondered how "air rage" affects the most frequent of fliers, so she spent two days in their shoes (flight attendants prefer Dansko clogs, thanks). If you're a flight attendant, we want to know: how does flying's bad rep affect what you do and how you do it?

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