Papa Don't Preach : Blog Of The Nation What effect will the Sarah Palin pick have on the Republican ticket?
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Papa Don't Preach

Papa Don't Preach

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Bristol Palin, the 17-year old daughter of GOP veep candidate Sarah Palin, getting off the Straight Talk Express. Source: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday looked like it was going to be all about the the arrival of Hurricane Gustav — but there was one other impending arrival that abruptly sucked up some news energy (and a little air at the GOP convention in St. Paul). GOP veep choice Governor Sarah Palin's 17-year old daughter, Bristol, is about to become a mom, and marry the teen father. Looking at the Republican ticket, it's a tough call on whether or not this hurt or helps the GOP. On one hand, she's making the decision to have the baby and make it legal — pro-life, and pro-family. On the other, out-of-wedlock pregnancy isn't exactly the kind of baby mama drama the Republicans like. Many evangelicals have rushed to Governor Palin's defense, while some conservatives privately wonder if her shaky explosion onto the national stage has hurt the ticket. Beyond the pregnancy, there's an abuse of power scandal, a short resume, and rumors that she belonged to a party that supported Alaska's secession. Still — she's got gun totin' middle class cred, and some women are overjoyed to see a gal on the Republican ticket. What do you think?