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Putting Lipstick On A Monolith

Putting Lipstick On A Monolith

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Supporters of Republican vice presidential candidate Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin wear toy red lips on September 10, 2008, in Fairbanks, Alaska. Source: sloomis08 hide caption

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Source: sloomis08

There have been few elections that are more fun to cover than this one — it is historic in almost every way, and it has put feminism back on the table (kitchen, dinner, and pub) the most I've seen in a long time. Sen. Hillary Clinton's candidacy — and now Gov. Sarah Palin's — have proven at least that women are not a block — we are no monolith — so any politician that makes a cynical choice may find that it backfires. We've talked at length about both the animosity and the support that Clinton received from women — and today we're going to ask women to consider Palin. (Here's a little required reading for you all, most of which was written by guests we'll speak with today.) I hope you'll weigh in too — does Palin thrill, disturb, and/or perplex you? Are the "Mommy Wars" back? What are you talking about when you talk about Palin with your friends?

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