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Teaching Taste

Teaching Taste

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Josh Groban and Sarah Brightman perform at the Concert for Diana in London in 2007. Source: Dave Hogan/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Dave Hogan/Getty Images

Growing up, my parents exposed my brother and me to all sorts of musical gems — Beethoven and Debussy, Webber and Hammerstein, Elvis and The Beatles. I knew who Sarah Brightman was long before I was even vaguely familiar with New Kids on the Block. I can remember dressing up like an opera singer and crooning "Memories," with maudlin passion, from our upstairs balcony. And I was moved to tears on more than one occasion during performances of Phantom, Les Mis, West Side, Sound of Music, Evita, you name it. My parents had a direct impact on my appreciation of music — and all things cultural, actually. In essence, they gave me taste.

Justin Davidson is the classical music critic for New York magazine. He hoped he could teach his son, Milo, good taste, too. Milo is ten, and already loves Bobby McFerrin. So far, so good.

Have you tried to teach your children to have musical, cultural or artistic taste? How did it go?

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