NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95247628/95248976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
The Latino Strategy

The Latino Strategy

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95247628/95248976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Para quien vas a votar? Source: ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Source: ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

Almost sounds like a Tom Clancy novel, doesn't it? Maybe not. In 2004, Latino voters rallied around George W. Bush, which helped him secure the White House for a second time. He did much better with that block of voters than previous Republican presidential candidates. But this time around, it looks like Senator McCain has his work cut out for him. The Latino vote could prove crucial in swing states, and analysts say he needs to secure more than 1/3 of the Latino vote for it to make a difference. And, of course, Senator Obama doesn't want to lose those votes. So, with a month left to go until election day, both candidates are working hard to convince Latinos to vote for them.

Today, we want to hear from Latino listeners: do you feel like the campaigns are paying enough attention to you? How have they reached out to you? Radio ads? Phone calls? Is it working?

NPR thanks our sponsors