Coming Up

December 24th Show

Merry Almost Christmas! Here's what's coming up on the show today:

We'll take a look back at the week in politics including Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich's no-holds-barred news conference, and the long and no doubt frustrating ballot recount for the Minnesota senate seat in Minnesota. Then we'll REALLY take a look back at the year in politics. Political Junkie Ken Rudin will talk about your most memorable moments in politics for 2008. Okay, we know there are so many options to choose from, so we'll make it easier. President-elect Barack Obama can't be on your list. He had a lot of moments, for sure. But this time we want to hear about some others. Following that, Ken will grace us with his twist on Twas the Night Before Christmas. Do you have a version of your own? Set the current time to a rhyme. (Try to make it a little better than the one I just did, please.)

In our second hour, author Michael Pollan will heroically defend our food. In his new book In the Defense of Food, Pollan argues that over the past twenty years, food has slowly vanished off our supermarket shelves only to be replaced by food imitations. But he offers a way back to basic nutrition. So tell us: What fake food do you indulge in? I'm guilty of the occasional protein bar. I just ate one, and I thought I was doing well, until my boss just informed me mid-crunch that I'm not eating real food. I'm sure Michael Pollan would agree. Then, we'll talk with baseball broadcaster Jon Miller about a newly discovered recording of Red Barber's ninth inning play-by-play of an electrifying moment that occured in a game that was actually played forty one years earlier. We'll explain at the end of the second hour.



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