Google: The New Business Card

As recently as two years ago I traveled somewhere on business, then freaked when I realized I'd forgotten my business cards. Lousy professional, I am. Anyway, Scott kindly mailed an envelope full of them to my hotel. But honestly? Though I did hand them out, I haven't taken them on a trip since, and I haven't even bothered to update them to reflect my current position. I just don't care — if you want to find me, it's pretty easy online. Still, at various events, people continue to ask for them, and I walk home with a pocketful.

So, you won't be surprised to find that I'm with Lifehacker's Gina Trapani on this one:

Small rectangular pieces of cardstock with your name, phone number and company logo are going the way of the land line, compact disc, and yellow pages. You might still come away from meetings with a briefcase full of business cards, but most likely you're going to search the web for a company or contact before you do anything with a bleached remnant of a dead tree.

Her solution? She says Google Profiles are your best bet, even if you have a name like Mary Johnson.

For people with a common name — or a name similar to someone with a stronger Internet presence — Google Profiles comes to the rescue. Google Profiles is the easiest way to ensure you appear on the first page of Google search results. Your Google Profile is a simple web page that lists your contact details, a short bio, your location(s), and web sites.

Read on to learn how to set yours up, if you're interested, and check out her profile here. So have you ditched your business cards?



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