September 29th Show

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Michael Moore calls capitalism "evil." We'll talk with him at the end of the first hour about his new film, 'Capitalism: A Love Story'. Photo by Spencer Platt/Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Overture hide caption

itoggle caption Photo by Spencer Platt/Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Overture
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Michael Moore calls capitalism "evil." We'll talk with him at the end of the first hour about his new film, 'Capitalism: A Love Story'.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Overture

Why Do People Hate The Census?
The census is a questionnaire that provides a count of everyone living in the United States that is issued every ten years. The next survey is in 2010 and participation is required by law. Your personal information is protected, and it only takes ten minutes to complete. Simple, right? So why does the census create so much animosity? Guests on the program talk about the history of the census and why so many in the general population seem to distrust it.

Michael Moore's 'Capitalism: A Love Story'
Want to talk with Michael Moore? The documentarian will be here to discuss his latest film Capitalism: A Love Story. And what does Moore have to say about capitalism? It's "evil, and you can't regulate evil." How's that for a love story?

Walking English: A Journey In Search Of Language
Author David Crystal takes us on a journey of the spoken word (language to be exact) through the written word (in his new book, Walking English: A Journey in Search of Language) and talks about what our accents and our unique verbal expressions say about us.

Ripped From The Headlines
Some of Law & Order's most memorable plot lines have literally been "ripped from the headlines." Executive producer Rene Balcer talks about how he decides to divvy up a "headlines" episode between Law & Order and Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and how soon is TOO soon to recreate a real-life murder.

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