NPR logo February 18th Show

February 18th Show

U.S. gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stands on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Alpine skiing Ladies downhill event of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. In our first hour, NPR's Tom Goldman and Howard Berkes give an Olympics roundup from Vancouver as the first week of the Games draws to a close. OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. gold medalist Lindsey Vonn stands on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Alpine skiing Ladies downhill event of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. In our first hour, NPR's Tom Goldman and Howard Berkes give an Olympics roundup from Vancouver as the first week of the Games draws to a close.

OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images

Olympic-Sized Olympics!!!
Wednesday was a banner day for the U.S. at the Olympic Winter Games. American competitors racked up a record six medals in one day. NPR's Tom Goldman and Howard Berkes talk to Neal Conan from Vancouver for an Olympics roundup as the first week of the Games draws to a close, from the big wins and losses to grumblings over coverage — and that ugly chain link fence. Plus, USA Today's Vicki Michaelis reports on the risks of pushing the limits at the Winter Games.

A Tribute To Lady Day
Billie Holiday, considered one of the best jazz vocalists of all time, is remembered for her demons nearly as much as her musical talent. But Grammy winning jazz singer and host of NPR's "JazzSet" Dee Dee Bridgewater sheds positive light on the performer in her latest album that pays tribute to the late jazz singer. Bridgewater, along with Farah Jasmine Griffin, talks about the mystery, style, and grace of Lady Day.

Pentagon Papers
The Pentagon Papers provoked massive public debate about the Vietnam War in the 1970s and raised the ire of President Nixon against the man who stole them from the U.S. government, Daniel Ellsberg. Now the subject of the Oscar-nominated documentary, The Most Dangerous Man in America, Ellsberg talks about how the papers almost never got published, and what's it like blowing the whistle on the United States government.

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