And In Other 'Life Of Mind' News

Yesterday I blogged about the argument over grad school, and what it's worth. Coincidentally, I was reading the Los Angeles Times' excellent book blog Jacket Copy, and saw that they'd linked to this wonderful graphic, illustrating various writers' day jobs, from Charlotte Bronte to William Faulkner. (More coincidentally, David Gura sent it to me at the exact same time. It's almost as if he can see into my cubicle.) From the L.A. Times blog:

When Faulkner accepted the Nobel in 1950, he said, "I feel that this award was not made to me as a man, but to my work — a life's work in the agony and sweat of the human spirit, not for glory and least of all for profit, but to create out of the materials of the human spirit something which did not exist before." These days, when every mega-advance in publishing makes headlines, it's nice to remember that Faulkner took to his typewriter "not for glory and least of all for profit."

Nice, indeed.



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