March 16th Show

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Last week, the Texas Board of Education made national headlines when it approved social studies curriculum guidelines that incorporate socially conservative ideas into American history. In our first hour, we'll look at what the decision means for Texas, how textbooks are written, and who ultimately decides what students will learn. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Last week, the Texas Board of Education made national headlines when it approved social studies curriculum guidelines that incorporate socially conservative ideas into American history. In our first hour, we'll look at what the decision means for Texas, how textbooks are written, and who ultimately decides what students will learn.

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What's In Your Textbook?
Last week, the Texas Board of Education made national headlines when it approved social studies curriculum guidelines that incorporate socially conservative ideas into American history. Texas reporter Nathan Bernier examines how the new guidelines could ultimately reshape history and economics textbooks for Texas and, potentially, much of the nation.

CIA Bombing
Last December, an al-Qaida double agent walked on to a U.S. base in Afghanistan and blew himself up, killing seven CIA officers. The bombing was one of the deadliest in CIA history. Former CIA operative Robert Baer explains what happened, and what it says about the culture of the agency.

"First" Women
March is Women's History Month. To mark the occasion, today we talk with, and about, some of the women who changed history by being "first" and opening new opportunities for present and future generations. NPR's Susan Stamberg, along with a naval captain and a tribal chief, talks about the opportunity and the responsibility of becoming first women.

Social Media in the Military
The military's branches are now all on the same (Web) page. Until late last month, access to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter varied widely across the military. But after a lengthy review, the Pentagon has authorized the use of social media sites for nearly all members of the military — giving many service members new tools to keep in touch with friends and family. The Pentagon's Price Floyd, who oversaw the development of the new policy, explains how it will effect troops, and how the military will balance security risks with social media accessibility.

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