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March 18th Show

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John Wall #11 of the Kentucky Wildcats practices before playing in the first round of the 2010 NCAA men's basketball tournament at the New Orleans Arena on March 18, 2010. In our second hour, we'll look at research that shows a drop in productivity during March Madness. Chris Graythen/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wall #11 of the Kentucky Wildcats practices before playing in the first round of the 2010 NCAA men's basketball tournament at the New Orleans Arena on March 18, 2010. In our second hour, we'll look at research that shows a drop in productivity during March Madness.

Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Tense Times for the U.S. and Israel
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton described the relationship between the U.S. and Israel as "unshakeable." Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu described the bond as "special." But in the last two weeks, a series of escalating events has led to rising tensions between the two countries. Middle East analysts Aaron David Miller, and David Makovsky examine the costs and the benefits of the relationship to both countries.

Texas Textbook Rebuttal
Conservatives on the Texas school board argue that changes they've proposed to the social studies curriculum will provide "balance" to a "liberal paradigm." On today's show, we'll revisit the textbooks discussion with history professor Jonathan Zimmerman. He says conservatives are correct — many history books lean left. But instead of bickering between viewpoints on either side, he offers a modest proposal: teach multiple viewpoints from multiple texts in the classroom.

The Myth of Black Inferiority
According to Tom Burrell, the dissemination of negative images of African Americans in the media perpetuate the long-standing myth of black inferiority. Burrell spent over four decades in the advertising industry, and in his book, Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority, Burrell traces the historical roots of the myth of black inferiority, and examines how Black American life today is "tainted by brainwashing."

It's March Madness. Is Anybody Working?
After he heard a rumor that a law firm cut-off online access to live streaming during March because employees were watching too many basketball games, Charles Clotfelter, a Duke University professor, sought to measure the effect of March Madness on productivity. So fess up. Are you watching today's games at work? What subterfuge are you employing to do it?

Remembering Olympian Wayne Collett
Track and field Olympian Wayne Collett died this week. He won a silver medal for the United States at the 1972 Munich Games, but was banned for life after what the International Olympic Committee called a "disgusting display" on the medal stand. In protest of racial discrimination in the United States, Collett did not face the American flag, talked through the national anthem, and gave a black power salute as the crowd booed his actions. He later explained, "I couldn't stand there and sing the words because I don't believe they're true.... We have the potential to have a beautiful country, but I don't think we do."

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