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March 2nd Show

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Mark Diaz, manager of "Schrank's Smoke 'n Gun" shop displays several handguns for sale at the store in Waukegan, IL., north of Chicago. In our first hour, we'll talk about a case before the Supreme Court that could extend the right to own a handgun beyond federal jurisdictions. M. Spencer Green/AP Photo hide caption

toggle caption M. Spencer Green/AP Photo
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Mark Diaz, manager of "Schrank's Smoke 'n Gun" shop displays several handguns for sale at the store in Waukegan, IL., north of Chicago. In our first hour, we'll talk about a case before the Supreme Court that could extend the right to own a handgun beyond federal jurisdictions.

M. Spencer Green/AP Photo

Do You Have a Right to Own Handguns?
When the Supreme Court overturned Washington, DC's handgun ban in 2008, it was a narrow ruling that left similar bans on handgun ownership elsewhere in the country intact. Today, the Court hears arguments in a case that could extend the right to own a handgun beyond federal jurisdictions, to include states and cities nationwide — and could ultimately reshape many of the gun regulations on the books. Supreme Court reporter David Savage explains the case before the court today, and attorneys on both sides of the argument weigh in on this case.

The Definition of Poverty
The Commerce Department plans today to announce development of the first new definition of poverty since the 1960's. But, it will only be supplemental. When it's released next fall, the new gauge will supplement the current, official poverty measure that is largely based on income. Rebecca Blank, Undersecretary for Economic Affairs at the Commerce Department, explains the new supplemental definition of poverty, what effect it will have on Americans, and why the new measurement will not become the official gauge of poverty.

Haiti: Picking Up the Pieces
It's been seven weeks since a massive earthquake flattened much of Port Au Prince and many areas in Haiti. As residents move on from rescue efforts, relief groups are helping to reconnect families, make sure aid is distributed evenly, and get Haitians accustomed to life after the damage. NPR's Debbie Elliott and others talk about the physical, mental, and emotional state of Haitians as they pick up the pieces, and rebuild.

Flu? What Flu?
What happened to the flu? This time of year usually means sneezes and fevers. But after the swine flu pandemic peaked last year, seasonal flu never materialized. According to an article in today's Wall Street Journal, "doctors and flu experts say the lull is unusual." NPR's Joanne Silberner explains what's driving the so-far very quiet flu season.

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