April 13th Show

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San Francisco-based Gap Inc. reported better than expected March sales with an 11 percent gain from one year ago. Could this be a sign of an economic turnaround? In our second hour, two economists read the economic signs after the "Great Recession." Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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San Francisco-based Gap Inc. reported better than expected March sales with an 11 percent gain from one year ago. Could this be a sign of an economic turnaround? In our second hour, two economists read the economic signs after the "Great Recession."

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Major News Headlines from Sudan, Kyrgyzstan and Poland
The people of Sudan went to the polls for the first time in a quarter century — just a prelude to a referendum next year that may redraw a colonial-era border. A coup d'etat in a little-known former Soviet republic raises questions about a key U.S. airbase. And a plane crash in a Russian forest is a cruel reminder of old wounds between Russia and Poland, and a test of a young democracy. NPR correspondents Gwen Thompkins, David Greene and Eric Westervelt, each explore what the international headlines tell us about the past and future in Sudan, Kyrgyzstan and Poland.

Bob Garfield and the Future of Advertising
Bob Garfield, known to many radio listeners as the co-host of NPR's On The Media, is also a longtime ad critic for Advertising Age magazine. After 25 years of praising and crucifying some of the biggest ad campaigns in America, he's decided to end his "Ad Review" column. Garfield talks about his career, why he's retiring now, and what he believes is the future of advertising.

Is the Economy Recovering?
The wild rollercoaster ride of economic news continues. The Dow closed over 11,000 for the first time since 2008, payroll numbers indicate that some companies are hiring again, and some economists predict a strong recovery. Still, unemployment remains persistently high, and the housing market may take years to recover. Two economists — former Labor Secretary Robert Reich, now with the University of California Berkeley, and Jeremy Siegel of the University of Pennsylvania — examine whether or not we are headed for an economic turnaround.

Hacking the Hackers
When Chinese hackers ransacked Indian government computers and swiped classified secrets, they were not aware that their operation had also been hacked. A crack team of virtual investigators based at the University of Toronto spends their time tracking, and stopping, e-crimes. Principal Investigator Rafal Rohozinski talks about how his team detected the hackers, what they uncovered, and the international ramifications of the incident.

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