NPR logo April 28th Show

April 28th Show

More than 30,000 Americans commit suicide every year. In our second hour, psychologist and suicide researcher Thomas Joiner sheds light on what few people understand about the reality of suicide. hide caption

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More than 30,000 Americans commit suicide every year. In our second hour, psychologist and suicide researcher Thomas Joiner sheds light on what few people understand about the reality of suicide.

Arkansas Political Junkie
Political Junkie Ken Rudin helps us survey the busy May primary schedule and reviews the week in political news. And on the heels of two debates in Arkansas and ahead of a primary on May 18, we'll hear from Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) and her challenger, Lt. Gov. Bill Halter.

The Truth About Suicide
More than 30,000 Americans commit suicide every year and thousands more attempt to take their own lives, but fail. Few people understand the reality of suicide. Myths and misconceptions are far more familiar: that it's a coward's way out, that it's an act of selfishness, that it's just a cry for help. Psychologist and suicide researcher Thomas Joiner deconstructs the many myths about suicide, and explains why it's so important to better understand this heart-wrenching facet of human behavior.

Why Doormen?
Thousands of New Yorkers gave a sigh of relief last week as the first doorman strike in nearly twenty years was narrowly averted. The well-dressed, often white-gloved men and women who sort mail, screen visitors, take in dry cleaning and open doors returned to work with a bump in pay. But, do we really need doormen? In an op-ed column for The New York Times entitled "Why Doormen?", journalist and author James Collins argues that doormen aren't necessary, and that's precisely why they are invaluable.

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