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May 20th Show

Oil coats beach sand at the mouth of the Mississippi River, south of Venice, Louisiana. In our first hour, NPR's Elizabeth Shogren and Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) talk about who's to blame for the oil spill, and who will pay. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Oil coats beach sand at the mouth of the Mississippi River, south of Venice, Louisiana. In our first hour, NPR's Elizabeth Shogren and Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) talk about who's to blame for the oil spill, and who will pay.

John Moore/Getty Images

Oil Spill Blame Game
Far more oil than originally feared might be gushing into the Gulf of Mexico — as much as 20 times more, according to an independent analysis. BP continues to insist that it's impossible to calculate the amount oil spewing from the broken rig.  As oil washes up along the Gulf shore and enters currents that could take it around Florida and up the east coast, investigators continue their search for answers about what happened and who is responsible.  NPR's Elizabeth Shogren and Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) talk about what we know about the spill, who's to blame and who will pay.

Kill Shakespeare
If William Shakespeare were writing today, Conor McCreery believes he wouldn't be writing plays, he'd be making comic books.  In Kill Shakespeare, McCreery's latest graphic novel co-written with Anthony Del Col, he combines the Bard's greatest heroes and worst villains on a mission to track down — who else — the evil wizard William Shakespeare.  McCreery explains: "We bring all of Shakespeare's great story features alive — the action, drama, romance, lust, violence, double crossing — and even the cross-dressing."  Conor McCreery and Anthony Del Col talk about where the unexpected concept came from, and who they hope will read a comic book thriller about William Shakespeare.

Madeline Albright on the Future of NATO
Twenty years after the Cold War, NATO is looking to redefine itself.  As the alliance continues to lead operations in Afghanistan, some in the United States argue that the organization contributes far too little to the war effort, while others view NATO as a strategic asset to counter the growing power of Russia and China.  Looking ahead to the next decade, NATO leaders commissioned a report written by a panel of experts led by chairperson Madeleine Albright,  former U.S. Secretary of State under President Clinton.  Secretary Albright examines the future of NATO, the war in Afghanistan and other global challenges facing the United States.

August Wilson's "Fences"
When the renowned playwright August Wilson died in 2005, he had spent decades chronicling the African-American experience for the American theater. The tragic drama "Fences" won Wilson his second Pulitzer Prize in 1987, and was the most commercially successful play in his groundbreaking "Pittsburgh Cycle"—a collection of ten plays portraying the struggles of black Americans across ten decades. Director Kenny Leon was a longtime friend and collaborator of Wilson's, and his Broadway revival of "Fences"—starring powerhouses Denzel Washington as the flawed and haunted Troy Maxson, and Viola Davis as his wife Rose—has already snared ten Tony nominations since opening last month. Kenny Leon talks about directing one of Wilson's most lauded plays, and maintaining the legacy of the groundbreaking playwright.

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