Facebook Privacy, Part Two

The Facebook privacy flap got louder this week. We talked with Farhad Manjoo, the Slate.com tech columnist, about the sites recent privacy changes, and whether or not people would be closing down their accounts in droves. Since our interview, he's talked with a Facebook spokesperson and done a bit more research and come to the conclusion that most people will fall in line with the new changes, but Facebook definitely has some explaining to do:

While Zuckerberg is spot-on when it comes to the Web's macro, share-more trends, he's gotten all of the little things wrong. Facebook could and should do a lot better on privacy. In particular, I'd urge it to introduce preset privacy levels. You should be able to go to your privacy settings and see one big dial that lets you choose one of five levels between "private" and "public." This setting would govern your entire profile; the more public you set the dial, the more you'll share with more people. By default, the dial would be somewhere in the middle, but you'd be able to shift it up or down at any time. You'd still be able to adjust more specific controls-you could set your profile to "public" but allow only close friends to see pictures of your kid-but few of us would ever need to.

Read the whole column, "Can We Get Some Privacy?" at slate.com.



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