May 5th Show

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Los Angeles Times columnist Meghan Daum believes houses are "a really expensive, high-maintenance, inanimate version of ourselves." In our second hour, Daum talks about her journey toward domestic integrity and her new memoir. ) hide caption

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The Political Junkie, Rep. Joe Sestak, and Sen. Arlen Specter
On May 18, Rep. Joe Sestak (D-PA) will challenge incumbent Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA) — who switched political parties last year — in the Pennsylvania Democratic primary. The two candidates will field questions from guest host Rebecca Roberts, Political Junkie Ken Rudin, and our listeners. Also, Ken Rudin gives the results on primaries in Indiana, North Carolina, and Ohio, and all the latest political news. And, of course, this week's trivia question.

Happiness Is... A New House
"There is no object of desire quite like a house", says Los Angeles Times columnist Meghan Daum. She talks about her new memoir, Life Would Be Perfect If I Lived In That House, and her journey through the domestic desires of her life — from a childhood spent searching for a destination just around the corner, to her adulthood bouncing from rental to rental.

Times Square Bomber Linked to Pakistan
Suspected Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistani-born U.S. citizen, allegedly told investigators he received training in Waziristan. The region in northwest Pakistan is known as a haven for extremist groups, including the Pakistani Taliban. On Sunday, the Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, though U.S. and Pakistani authorities raised doubts about the claim. Author Ahmed Rashid argues that neither the CIA nor Pakistan's intelligence agency know much about what happens in Waziristan, and something must be done before more global attacks are launched. Rashid joins Rebecca Roberts to talk about the links between Faisal Shahzad and Pakistan.

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