What Is Apple Thinking?

The investigation continues into the iPhone prototype that was lost in a bar and found its way into the hands of Gizmodo, the tech news blog. Police confiscated computers and servers from the Gizmodo editor who broke the story after Apple filed a complaint. Apple reportedly tried to question the young man who found the phone — and later handed it over to Gizmodo for $5,000. In today's New York Times, David Carr wonders what Steve Jobs could possibly be thinking. Apple is, he complains, "drawing attention for all the wrong reasons":

Anybody with a kilobyte of common sense could have told Steve Jobs that the five minutes of pleasure that came from making a criminal complaint against journalists would be followed by much misery.

Apple executives have often behaved as though the ultimate custody and control of information lies with them, and the company has gone to extraordinary lengths to protect its interests. Yet for all of its spectacular achievements, Apple is exhibiting a remarkable tone-deafness in the issue at hand. As Apple is changing into a media company, as well, its Silicon Valley brand of aggression is running up against its broader ambitions.

And it's not just the lost iPhone saga. Carr notes that Apple's also faced intense criticism lately for refusing a range of apps, and for demonizing Flash video.

Whether you're an Apple fan or an Apple hater, he raises some interesting questions.



Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor

Support comes from