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June 17th Show

BP CEO Tony Hayward (center) testifies on Capitol Hill. i

BP CEO Tony Hayward (center) arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington  to testify before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on "the role of BP in the Deepwater Horizon Explosion and oil spill. In our second hour, guest examine how to calculate the bill from the oil spill. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP Photo hide caption

toggle caption Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP Photo
BP CEO Tony Hayward (center) testifies on Capitol Hill.

BP CEO Tony Hayward (center) arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington  to testify before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on "the role of BP in the Deepwater Horizon Explosion and oil spill. In our second hour, guest examine how to calculate the bill from the oil spill.

Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP Photo

Openly Gay in Public Schools
A Mississippi school board canceled its prom this year after a female student asked to bring her girlfriend to the event, and to wear a tuxedo. School officials said they don't allow same-sex dates at the prom. High school is a challenging time for most teens—even more so for the thousands of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students. Tony Cox talks with a school official who faces these issues, and with the Executive Director of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network about the experience of being openly LGBT in high school.

Why Soccer Won't Bring World Peace

As the World Cup continues, we hear a lot about how the games can unite contentious neighboring countries. But James Montague argues that soccer will never ease tensions in the Middle East, and often serves to exacerbate tensions across the Arab world. Algeria is the only Arab country that qualified for the World Cup tournament. Instead of rallying support for the team, much of the Arab world has turned against it.  In a piece written for Foreign Policy magazine, Montague explores how global politics is reflected in the World Cup.  His article is entitled, "Unity through soccer? Not in the Middle East".

How Much Should BP Pay?
BP's CEO Tony Hayward faced a panel of angry Capitol Hill lawmakers today and issued his latest apology for the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Today's hearing comes a day after President Obama extracted a big financial commitment from the oil giant. In a meeting at the White House, BP agreed to put $20 billion into an escrow fund to pay the claims of Gulf residents hurt by the leak. Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) this morning called the deal a "$20 billion shakedown" of the oil company, but many others demand far more compensation from BP.  Guests, including NPR's Mara Liasson, talk about today's hearing, who pays for the short- and long-term effects of the spill, and how much BP may be liable for.

Nina Simeone, Princess Noire
Singer Nina Simone left people with widely varying impressions of her — from loved to hostile... but all of them passionate. Yet her talent is unquestionable. In her new book, Princess Noire, The Tumultuous Reign of Nina Simone, journalist and author Nadine Cohodas chronicles the life and rage of the legendary singer, whose songs like "Young, gifted and black" proved to be anthems of the Civil Rights Movement.

 

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