August 10th Show

Doug Lansky chronicles travel gone wrong. i

In our first hour, the author of "The Titanic Awards" chronicles the worst traveling experiences. Perigee Trade hide caption

itoggle caption Perigee Trade
Doug Lansky chronicles travel gone wrong.

In our first hour, the author of "The Titanic Awards" chronicles the worst traveling experiences.

Perigee Trade

Cops vs Citizens
When police shootings end badly, it can often cause citizens to mistrust the cops who are supposed to protect them. From the mayor of New Orleans calling in the feds to investigate that city's troubled police department, to the city of New York settling with the family of Sean Bell for more than $7 million, communities are growing increasingly weary of law and disorder.  A.C. Thompson of ProPublica, Ron Hampton of the National Black Police Association, and Connie Rice, chairwoman of the Blue Ribbon Commission that investigated the LAPD Rampart scandal, talk about troubled police forces and their attempts to reform for the better.

Travel (Mis)adventures
At its best, traveling is memorable, character-building and expands our knowledge of what is possible in the world.  At its worst, traveling is memorable, character-building and expands our knowledge of what can go wrong in the world. But when your traveling experience is its very worst, you could win a Titanic Award from today's guest travel writer Doug Lansky, author of The Titanic Awards: Celebrating the Worst of Travel.

Aid Workers in Afghanistan
Last week, ten humanitarian workers were killed in a remote area of northern Afghanistan while on a medical mission. They were part of a non-governmental organization — International Assistance Mission — just one of many international NGOs providing assistance to the Afghan people. While aid workers focus on issues like health care and education, they also face daily dangers operating as civilians caught between military forces and insurgents. Guests on the program talk about the perils of international and local humanitarian workers in Afghanistan.

Ramadan Explained
Ramadan begins this week, and that means millions of Muslims around the world will begin praying and fasting from dawn to dusk. But for many non-Muslims, the fasting practice may be the extent of what they know about Islam's holy month. Author Vali Nasr explains that while Ramadan is a month of fasting and prayer, it's also a time of consumerism and "political skulduggery."

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