What Were You Doing On April 11, 1954? : Blog Of The Nation When we learn about history, we tend to focus on the action-packed days. But what about those "off" days, where nothing of significance actually happened? According to a Cambridge-based scientist one April Sunday in 1954 was the most boring day ever.
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What Were You Doing On April 11, 1954?

PIck a day, any day on this calendar -- it was probably more exciting than April 11, 1954. studiocurve/Flickr hide caption

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studiocurve/Flickr

Chances are you weren't even born yet. Or perhaps you were in school, working, getting married — basically, lots of different things. It's interesting how much importance each of us puts into a certain day in history, whether it's a nationwide anniversary, or a death in the family.

We also put lots of significance on particular days, and luckily, we have someone to help us comb through the occurrences of the past. At the end of each month, NPR's wise, omniscient librarian Kee Malesky sends out an e-mail with a rundown of important dates in history and reminders of various holidays and awareness events for the month ahead. For example, December is the month for ties, as well as 55 years since Rosa Parks didn't move to the back of the bus.

While we tend to focus on the days where something happened to someone happened ... What about the days where "nothing actually happened?"

The Telegraph reports that a computer programmer in Cambridge has figured out the most boring day in history was, in fact, April 11, 1954. Seriously. William Tunstall Pedoe has produced a computer program with a complex system of surveying hundreds of millions of facts about newsworthy events from the past. But why this one Sunday in the mid 1950s?:

Nobody significant died that day, no major events apparently occurred and, although a typical day in the 20th century has many notable people being born, for some reason that day had only one who might make that claim — Abdullah Atalar, a Turkish academic.

The irony is, though, that — having done the calculation — the day is interesting for being exceptionally boring. Unless, that is, you are Abdullah Atalar.

With that said, which day do you consider the most boring day in history?