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There's A Hawk At The Library Of Congress

In this handout photo provided by the Library of Congress, a juvenile female Cooper's hawk is shown in the Main Reading Room in the Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress, Friday January 21, 2011 in Washington. Abby Brack/AP Photo/Library of Congress hide caption

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Abby Brack/AP Photo/Library of Congress

In this handout photo provided by the Library of Congress, a juvenile female Cooper's hawk is shown in the Main Reading Room in the Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress, Friday January 21, 2011 in Washington.

Abby Brack/AP Photo/Library of Congress

And no, that doesn't mean former Vice President Dick Cheney's there researching the best ways to beef up national security.

There's a beautiful juvenile female Cooper's Hawk soaring above patrons' heads in the main reading room at the Library of Congress here in Washington. The room itself is majestic enough, but this image of the hawk flying against a blue "sky" of Edwin Blashfield's recently restored mural is a real showstopper.

She's been in the building since Wednesday, and, reports Matt Raymond, the LOC's head of communications, a woman from the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia is attempting to trap her. This being a bird at the library, they've compiled all kinds of additional information about the Cooper's Hawk, should you be interested in learning more, or hearing what her call might sound like.