Big Game Losses Can Be Costly For Uber Fans

A diehard Green Bay Packers fan - or Cheesehead - gets ready to sport his green and gold at the NFC Conference Championship game against the Chicago Bears on January 23, 2011. The Packers won the game 21-14 to advance to Super Bowl XLV. i

A diehard Green Bay Packers fan - or Cheesehead - gets ready to sport his green and gold at the NFC Conference Championship game against the Chicago Bears on January 23, 2011. The Packers won the game 21-14 to advance to Super Bowl XLV. CHRISTOPHER MACSURAK/flickr hide caption

itoggle caption CHRISTOPHER MACSURAK/flickr
A diehard Green Bay Packers fan - or Cheesehead - gets ready to sport his green and gold at the NFC Conference Championship game against the Chicago Bears on January 23, 2011. The Packers won the game 21-14 to advance to Super Bowl XLV.

A diehard Green Bay Packers fan - or Cheesehead - gets ready to sport his green and gold at the NFC Conference Championship game against the Chicago Bears on January 23, 2011. The Packers won the game 21-14 to advance to Super Bowl XLV.

CHRISTOPHER MACSURAK/flickr

When it comes to just watching football, the chances of your health taking a hit are slim. Well, if you plan on throwing or attending a Super Bowl party, perhaps too many wings, nachos, and chili will give you some heartburn. And if you're betting on a team (note: the Packers are favored to win by a two-and-a-half point spread) and you tell a friend to bet on what ends up being the losing team, who knows what may happen.

While your favorite sports team's loss can be emotionally devastating — especially for the Cheeseheads and the Terrible Towel wavers — the effects of the big game may do more damage than intended, according to a report from USA Today:

Cardiac death rates increased in Los Angeles County after the Los Angeles Rams lost to the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1980 Super Bowl, according to the study in Monday's journal Clinical Cardiology. Unlike a previous study that linked World Cup soccer game losses to cardiac deaths, most of them in men, the new study showed that death rates increased more for women (27%) vs. men (15%) and older people (22%). Overall death rates also increased, but the cardiac death increases were the most dramatic.

Physicians are still trying to identify how triggers for heart-related deaths work, and ways to reduce incidents like these in the future. For now, maybe diehard fans of the two storied football franchises should stay positive and content that their team made it this far, regardless of the outcome.

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