NPR logo Boom Goes The Dynamite, Yet Again

Boom Goes The Dynamite, Yet Again

When it comes to being a sports anchor, it helps to know more than just the names of the teams playing on the highlight reel. upheaval/iStockphoto hide caption

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When it comes to being a sports anchor, it helps to know more than just the names of the teams playing on the highlight reel.

upheaval/iStockphoto

Somehow, I find myself on here, once again, talking about a profession that I wanted so bad at one point in my life — sports reporting. Well, more specifically the role of a sports anchor. After a few uncomfortable stints sweating under the lights and nervous teleprompter reading in college, I channeled my broadcasting dreams over to the radio station. That transition has paid off, but I still have respect for those aiming to be the next Stuart Scott or Dan Patrick.

Learning to become a trustworthy sports anchor takes determination, work ethic, and more than a general knowledge of the events you're covering, among other things. Oh, and maybe some screw-ups here or there. Who says you will successfully anchor a broadcast on the first try?

Just look to these up-and-comers from the University of Hartford student-run TV station. Nearly any and all on-air gaffes are committed in a five-minute span — awkward pauses, nervous laughing, strange interruptions, frequent repetitions, and miscues to highlight reels.

I don't know about you, but that duo is reminiscent of the "Boom Goes the Dynamite" kid.

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Yes, an on-air meltdown is embarrassing for anyone. But how do you learn a trade if you don't fail at least once in a while? Tell that to the incidental pioneers of the sports-broadcast-gaffe-turned-viral-video. As Deadspin reports,

"...Brian "Boom Goes The Dynamite" Collins is still in media — he recently reported on synthetic marijuana for KSAX in Alexandria, Minn. — and Matt Lorch of the infamous Lorchcast is a co-anchor at WHDH, the NBC affiliate in Boston. These days, a broadcast meltdown tends to be the beginning of a broadcast career."

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See? But remember — there's no crying in baseball. Or in any sports. Or sports reporting.