NPR logo May 4th Show

May 4th Show

An image of Saudi-born alleged terror mastermind Osama bin Laden from a video released in 2001. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
-/AFP/Getty Images

The Political Junkie
President Barack Obama's enjoying a slight bump in his approval ratings since authorizing the mission that killed Osama bin Laden. Most presidents in modern history who've served during dramatic events have enjoyed a similar boost in popularity — George W. Bush after 9/11, Franklin Roosevelt after Pearl Harbor, George H.W. Bush after the start of the first Gulf War. Ron Kaufman served as a senior advisor to President George H.W. Bush. He will join NPR political editor Ken Rudin and guest host Mary Louise Kelly to talk about how long the boost tends to last, and what it means for President Obama in this political environment. They'll also recap the week in politics from the second Blagojevich trial to the president's speech at the White House correspondents dinner.

Gone With The Wind
Widely considered The Great American Novel, and often remembered for its epic Academy Award-winning film version, Gone With the Wind celebrates its 75th anniversary this year. First published in the spring of 1936, Margaret Mitchell's book was an instant success. The novel won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and the 1939 film version went on to win eight Academy Awards. Guest host Mary Louise Kelly speaks with best-selling author Pat Conroy, who wrote the introduction to the new commemorative printing of Gone With The Wind.

Article continues after sponsorship

Is Pakistan Doing Enough?
Osama bin Laden's hideout in a large compound a few hundred meters from the Pakistan Military Academy and less than an hour's drive from the capital raises questions about the commitment and competency of Pakistan as an ally in the fight against terrorism. A number of U.S. congress members are calling to cut-off federal aid to Pakistan, while others warn that Islamabad remains an important, if difficult, ally. Guest host Mary Louise Kelly talks with Rashed Rahman, editor of one of Pakistan's major English language newspapers The Daily Times, and an intelligence expert about the importance of the U.S. relationship with Pakistan and whether or not Islamabad is doing enough to combat terrorism.

Should The U.S. Release Bin Laden Photos?
Top officials in the Obama administration are in apparent disagreement over whether to release graphic photos of the body of Osama bin Laden. Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have reportedly advised the president that the release could prompt a backlash against the United States. While CIA director Leon Panetta says it's important to release a photo "to reveal to the rest of the world the fact that we were able to get and kill him." In a piece for the New Yorker, Philip Gourevitch warns of "the overwhelming power of crude images of violence to define and polarize our historical moment." He says that releasing photos will not convince anyone who doesn't already believe that he's been killed. Guest host Mary Louise Kelly talks with Gourevitch about his piece "Don't release the photos."