May 26th Show

In our second hour, guests talk about the art and business of audio books.

In our second hour, guests talk about the art and business of audio books. hide caption

itoggle caption

Arab Spring And Israel
One line, in particular, from President Obama's speech last week about U.S. policy in the Middle East stirred up anger in Congress and in Israel: "[B]orders of Israel and Palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps." Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu quickly declared that his country "will not return to the indefensible borders" of 1967. Host Neal Conan speaks with The Washington Post's Glenn Kessler and The New York Times Jerusalem bureau chief about the exchange of words between the two leaders and the effects of the Arab Spring on Israel on and the peace process.

California Prisons
The United States Supreme Court this week ordered California to dramatically reduce its prison population. More than 30,000 inmates must be transferred or released in the next two years. By a 5-4 majority, the justices concluded that overcrowding in California prisons violates constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. California officials say they will not arbitrarily free inmates — Governor Jerry Brown has a plan to move tens of thousands of low-level offenders from state prisons to local county jails. Neal Conan talks with Michael Montgomery of the Center for Investigative Reporting's California Watch about what the state can do to comply with the Court order.

Audie Awards
Audio book sales continue to climb, but the anemic economy and competition from radio, iPods, podcasts and other technology poses a long-term challenge for the industry. The Audio Publishing Association has just awarded the 2011 Audie Awards, the Oscars of spoken word entertainment. Host Neal Conan speaks with Janet Bensen, president of the Audio Publishing Association, and Arnie Cardillo, owner of and lead producer at Live Oak Media about the art and business of audio books.

Serbian police arrested one of the world's most wanted fugitives today. Gen. Ratko Mladic spent more than 15 years on the run after the UN War Crimes Tribunal indicted him on charges of genocide and other crimes committed during the war in Bosnia. The former Bosnian Serb Army commander is accused of orchestrating the 1995 massacre at Srebrenica, where nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys were slaughtered in the worst single atrocity in Europe since World War II. Host Neal Conan talks with Serbian Ambassador Vladimir Petrovic about the significance of Mladic's capture, the trial that lies ahead, and why it took so long to find him.



Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.