Are You Really On The Phone Right Now?

He looks like he's talking to someone, but is anyone really on the other end? i

He looks like he's talking to someone, but is anyone really on the other end? iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto
He looks like he's talking to someone, but is anyone really on the other end?

He looks like he's talking to someone, but is anyone really on the other end?

iStockphoto

Cell phones have become extremely valuable parts of our lives. Our show today about the BART decision to temporarily suspend Wi-Fi and cell service, shows that people take communication very seriously.

Sometimes I think about what I did before I had a cell phone — how I made plans or knew how to get places or took pictures of things.

Cell phones have another valuable function. A new Pew study found that 13 percent of cell phone owners pretended to be using their phone in order to avoid interacting with the people around them. I'd bet the rates in New York or DC, where we're walking around with lots of people to avoid, aren't much higher.

You've probably done it. Maybe you saw an ex or a smiley representative from a non-profit approaching and you just threw the phone to your ear and started asking questions nodding and "mhmm-ing" away.

Have you ever?

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