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The Floating Photographer

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The Floating Photographer

Way Beyond The Garden

The Floating Photographer

Couple weeks back, I checked in from eastern Oregon while I was out there on assignment. You can now read the story I was chasing, and better yet, hear it. I love recording natural sound as much as I do talking to people; it doesn't get any better for me when I get to do both.

But I admit, radio can only take you so far when the subject is the visual arts. So be sure to check out the underworld world of Mary Edwards, part biologist, part artist, and yes, part fish.

Mary and I spent a day in dry suits on the Lostine River outside Joseph, OR. It was salmon spawning time and she wanted to shoot some big ones. In the radio story, she finds a slightly beat-up male about 4 years old. The light was dim — he was under a big log, and she doesn't use a flash — but a few liquid rays filtered through his tail.

This guy was probably 3' long with an 18" body depth. Mary almost had to touch him before I could discern his shape, he was so thoroughly camouflaged by his clean, clear and oh so cold environment. photo credit: Mary Edwards hide caption

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photo credit: Mary Edwards

She snapped a whole bunch of other pix that day, but I'm now going take up some mega bandwidth on this page to feature a whopping photograph from her trip to Alaska last year. It's a hell of a pix, and hers is a hell of a tale.

The Floating Photographer

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To hear it, all you gotta do is CLICK.

Is seeing believing? Guess it depends on what you want to believe. This seemingly impossible shot of underwater fish and above the water bears might be possible, but is way beyond the pay grade of Mary Edwards' camera. Instead, she stitched these two images together in post-production, images she indeed captured in the same Alaskan river within the same hour. photo credit: Mary Edwards hide caption

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photo credit: Mary Edwards
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