An expert FAA advisory committee has recommended that airline passengers be allowed to use most personal electronic devices below 10,000 feet. Leonardo Patrizi/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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FAA May Stop Making You Power Off Those Electronics

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Send Us Your Cellphone Stories

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SpaceX launched an upgraded version of its Falcon 9 rocket Sept. 30 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, northwest of Los Angeles. SpaceX hide caption

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Latino Rebels: Getting Stories From The Ground Up

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Workers assemble solar panels at the now-bankrupt Suntech in the eastern Chinese city of Wuxi. Overproduction in the country has helped lower the cost of solar panels. Peter Parks /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Your Digital Trail, And How It Can Be Used Against You

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Law professor Lawrence Lessig, shown here in 2009, is suing an Australian record label for threatening to sue him over an alleged YouTube copyright violation. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

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Record Label Picks Copyright Fight — With The Wrong Guy

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Phantom Vibration Syndrome: That phenomenon where you think your phone is vibrating when it's not. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Phantom Phone Vibrations: So Common They've Changed Our Brains?

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California State Sen. Darrell Steinberg applauded the governor for signing the legislation, saying that it gives minors "common sense protections" online. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Those are the hands of David Bradley, an original member of the IBM PC team and the inventor of the control-alt-delete function, hitting the right keys. Bob Jordan /AP hide caption

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BlackBerry: If You Don't Survive, May You Rest In Peace

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Customers test out iPad minis on display in Los Angeles. Students who received free iPads from the Los Angeles Unified School District in a deal with Apple are finding ways to use them for more than just classwork. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Students Find Ways To Hack School-Issued iPads Within A Week

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