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Just Two Things...

We were thinking about how we could cover President Bush's announcement about Sudan and the also-major news about the Nigerian presidency, and we immediately knew who we needed to talk to and who you might appreciate hearing from...Dr. Jendayi Frazer. She's sharp, smart, knows her stuff and is, literally, on the move...

A fresh squeeze of behind-the-curtain juice:
We knew we wanted to talk to her, just didn't know where, how and when (you know, all the essentials...who needs them, right?). Guess you can say we were lingering between wishful thinking and actualizing the "get." The long-short? Fabulous Tell Me More head honcho (or honchette?) producer Marie Nelson was able to track her down and, as it turned out, she was actually in Africa attending the Nigerian president's inaugural festivities. But there was one condition to her talking to us — it had to happen "now," as in right then and there. Yeah, crazy I know. She wasn't cold about it at all, just one of those get-in-where-you-fit-in kind of situations...she has a robust calendar.

Of course, any interview deserves its fair share of preparation, but in this business, when someone says now or never...you go with what you know and the rest is on a wing and a prayer. Besides, what were we supposed to say..."Umm...sorry, Ms. Frazer. We'll catch up with you later"? Not! She's U.S. Assistant Secretary of State. A no-brainer there.

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In the end, we thought it went well. You be the judge. Take a listen and let us know what you think...

Moving on to the FDA and gay blood.

One of our producers put us on to this story. Not that it was breaking news, but we were intrigued by the fact that for over twenty years its been widely accepted that any man who's had sex with another man since 1977 is banned from donating blood. Ever.

Thought this could prompt interesting (and, of course, mixed) thoughts, especially if you're a routine blood donor, or if you've ever received blood that is not your own. Across the board, everyone seems to agree that it's a matter of public safety. Few arguments there.

But I'm particularly interested in knowing what you thought about a point our guest, Joel Ginsberg, raised. He argues that heterosexual men or women — who in some cases, have an even more extensive sexual history than some homosexuals — are not held to the same degree of precaution, nor is their sexual promiscuity perceived as potentially hazardous as gays.

Just a note that we did reach out to the FDA on this. We haven't yet heard back from them (we might at a later time), but you can learn more about the policy here.

What are your thoughts on this?...On Ginsberg's arguments?

Told you this morning we had a good show in the works. I try and live up to my word...

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