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It's Only Iowa, Right?

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Lee, here...

Happy Friday!

We wanted to end the week on an energetic note, which wasn't too difficult considering yesterday's results from the country's first Presidential contest in Iowa. Democratic Sen. Barack Obama and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, a Republican, both came out on top.

On the Democratic side, there was a gap of eight percentage points between Obama (28 percent) and his closest opponent John Edwards, the former senator from North Carolina. To the surprise of many, New York Sen. Hillary Clinton finished with 28 percent of the state's Democratic vote — almost 10 points behind Obama, the front runner.

Similarly, Huckabee won with a significant lead (34 percent) among Republican candidates in the state. His closest opponent, former Massachussetts Governor Mitt Romney, trailed him by nine percentage points. Fred Thompson, a past senator from Tennessee, finished third. And so forth, and so on...

Clearly, the heat is on in the race for the White House. The results in Iowa have shaken what some Washington insiders predicted. And, regardless of what happens on the journey ahead of him, Barack Obama has made history in a number of areas — as the first black candidate to win Iowa (with whites making up 93 percent of the voter turnout there, that's pretty significant) and, arguably, the first black man with a serious chance at winning the Presidency.

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But what does this all mean ... to you?

It's only Iowa, right? Demographics in the state don't necessarily reflect the composite of the U.S.

But you tell us. Were you surprised, or swayed, by yesterday's results? ... Will the rest of the country follow suit?

Think about it over the weekend (or right now) and let us know what you think.

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