Finance & Economy

Jobless? What's Your Story?

Job seekers wait to speak to potential employers at a job fair in Philadelphia. The unemployment rat

Job seekers wait to speak to potential employers at a job fair in Philadelphia. The unemployment rate fell to 10 percent in November as employers cut the smallest number of jobs since the recession began. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Rourke/AP

Arguably, every story out of Washington means something to somebody; it's the nation's capital, after all.

But there are three big stories, in particular, that we're keeping our eyes on:

1) Unemployment: One of out SIX Americans of working age are unemployed or underemployed. Are you one of them? Even if you are not, do you know someone who is? How worried are you? Or (if you prefer) how confident are you? What do you see in your future and what would help you get there?

President Obama gave another speech on unemployment today. Take a listen and let us know what you think.

And, we were happy to deliver some good news about jobs on the program today. Damond Smart, one of the people we've been following for over a year now, lives in an Indiana community that's one of the areas most affected by unemployment. Today, he told us he now has a job. But there was a shadow over his happy news. He'll tell you what happened.

2) Abortion rights: The Senate may vote today on how the health care bill will treat abortion coverage. We'll keep you posted.

3) The Supreme Court: The first decision of the new term was handed down today by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and the court heard arguments in another big case. We'll be listening for the great Nina Totenberg to tell us what's up.

Other than that, we're keeping an eye on holiday prep — trying to take in some holiday cheer ourselves. If you have some ideas for holiday segments you'd like to see (or, rather, hear ... sorry) don't keep them to yourselves!

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

About