My Chemical Romance released its defining album, The Black Parade, on Oct. 23, 2006. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Join The Black Parade: My Chemical Romance And The Politics Of Taste

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"A Song for You" was recorded at the sessions that produced Donny Hathaway's 1972 album Donny Hathaway Live, but it wasn't included on the original album. More than four decades later, it illustrates how Hathaway merged technique with pure emotion. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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The Who in 1969, the year the group released the rock opera Tommy. Earlier in the 1960s, the band says it only cared about singles. By 1971, it was making albums that would help define the "heritage rock" industry. Steve Wood/Getty Images hide caption

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"Jack [Rose] transcended the shadow of [John] Fahey, and I think that's really difficult to do," Steve Gunn says. "It was undeniable when he played — people paid attention." Sam Erickson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sam Erickson/Courtesy of the artist

As balloons fell after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump accepted his party nomination last night, the Rolling Stones' "You Can't Always Get What You Want' rang through the arena. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images