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On top of the world: Tower Records founder Russ Solomon above his Sacramento, Calif., store in 1989. Courtesy of All Things Must Pass hide caption

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The Industry

The Life And Death Of Tower Records, Revisited

A new documentary from Colin Hanks looks back on a business empire that helped shape the tastes of many music fanatics.

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M'Lady's Records, a label based in Portland, Ore., has begun discounting sales to women to protest the gender-based wage gap. Photo by Morgan Walker/Illustration by Julian Ring/NPR hide caption

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A crowd gathers at Hollywood's Amoeba Music for a free weekday concert in 2007. A new shift to Friday album releases could spell logistical trouble for independent record stores like this one. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An image from a video made by photographer Aaron Mischel which featured the song "Happy" by the band Secrets in Stereo. Aaron Mischel/YouTube hide caption

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The Industry

Tiny Music Royalties Add Up, Unexpectedly

The Internet is full of music, but not all of it generates income for composers and songwriters. Services that specialize in "micro-licensing" are helping to fix that.

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Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014. Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS hide caption

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The Industry

Songwriters And Streaming Services Battle Over Decades-Old Decree

The Department of Justice is exploring big changes to the music publishing business for the first time since World War II.

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One of the record presses on the floor at the Quality Record Pressings plant in Salina, Kan. Courtesy of Acoustic Sounds hide caption

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Madonna, Deadmau5, Kanye West and Jay Z onstage at the Tidal launch event. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs stands in front of a projection of iTunes at a presentation in 2004. Ian Waldie/Getty Images hide caption

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The Industry

With Downloads In Decline, Can iTunes Adapt?

Digital downloads of iTunes fell sharply in 2014, as consumers abandoned Apple's music store in favor of cheap, easy-to-use subscription services.

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Bill Adler (center) with LL Cool J (left) and Fab 5 Freddy at LL's mother's house in 1988. Daniel Root/Courtesy of Bill Adler hide caption

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The Industry

Cornell To Digitize A Rich Hip-Hop Archive

The founding publicity director of Def Jam Records, Bill Adler, amassed a highly valuable collection of music, writing and images.

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The cast of WKRP in Cincinnati, recently reissued on DVD by Shout! Factory, which collected licenses to include most of the original music broadcast on the show. Courtesy Sony Pictures Television hide caption

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Jr. Gong, Stephen Marley, Cham, Sean Paul — the list goes on. A massive jam session ensues and nearly everyone leaps onstage to spit some lyrics. To call this reggae history is no hyperbole. Empress K/For NPR hide caption

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Casey Kasem, in 1975. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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