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The Yocha Dehe tribe grows, mills and markets its own extra-virgin olive oil. The tribe's mill uses top-of-the-line equipment imported from Florence, Italy. Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse hide caption

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Food For Thought

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

Once impoverished, California's Yocha Dehe tribe found success with a casino complex. Now the tribe is using its newfound wealth to grow, bottle and sell premium olive oil.

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