The "Green Giant" mechanical tea harvester, one of only a few in the world, does the manual work of 500 people. Wayne's View Photography/Courtesy of Charleston Tea Plantation hide caption

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Richland Single Estate Old Georgia Rum is made from cane grown, cut, distilled and rested on the premises of a 100-acre plantation in Richland, Ga. International awards and gold medals have poured in for this field-to-glass rum. Courtesy of Richland Rum hide caption

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In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

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This 2014 photo shows an assortment of savory jams: (from left) Terrapin Ridge Farms balsamic garlic and herb jam, Wozz Kitchen Creations triple ale onion jam, The Prairie Gypsies red hot lover jam, Taste of Inspirations mango pepper jelly and Skillet Bacon Spread original bacon spread. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Rescued Relish is an anything-goes condiment made from excess produce that Philabundance, a Philadelphia anti-hunger organization, can't move. The relish is modeled on a Pennsylvania Dutch chowchow recipe — a tangy mix of sweet, spicy and sour flavors. Courtesy of Drexel Food Lab hide caption

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Pacific white shrimp raised in Eco Shrimp Garden's indoor aqua farm in New York's Hudson Valley, which owner Jean Claude Frajmund describes as a spa for shrimp. They grow for six months before they're ready for harvest. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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A colorful selection of gelato flavors for sale at a shop in Florence, Italy. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Hot Enough For You? Cool Off With A Brief History Of Frozen Treats

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Cover detail from A Square Meal, by Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe Harper hide caption

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Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

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A group of men clean a week's haul of seabird eggs. Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences hide caption

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The Gold-Hungry Forty-Niners Also Plundered Something Else: Eggs

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Kristie and Drew Harper opened a small bistro in Brookfield, Mo. Town leaders are courting other businesses in an effort to grow the local economy. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Teresa, 31, worked at a pork processing plant in Nebraska for five years until injuries to her shoulder forced her to quit. She still has pain and can only work part-time. Brian Seifferlein/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Working 'The Chain,' Slaughterhouse Workers Face Lifelong Injuries

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Greta Horner holds a photo of her and her husband Ed taken a few months before he died. Dan Boyce/Rocky Mountain PBS for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Fines For Meat Industry's Safety Problems Are 'Embarrassingly Low'

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Pictured in the corn fields of the student-managed farm she helped run this summer, Taryn Riediger is an aspiring farmer. After graduating, she expects to work livestock for someone else before possibly returning to her family's farm. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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