Sonny Perdue, who's been named to head the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has held many political offices in his home state of Georgia. Farmers liked him. Environmentalists, not so much. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Concerns about mercury contamination have led many pregnant women to under-consume seafood. So the FDA issued a new chart explaining what to eat and what to avoid. But critics say it muddles matters. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture

The hardworking Instant Pot, touted by its fans on social media, is Amazon's top-selling item in the U.S. How it got to No. 1 is a lesson in viral marketing savvy. Grace Hwang Lynch hide caption

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Grace Hwang Lynch

In Mexico, chamoy comes in many forms, including sauce, seasoning powder, shaved ice and candy. A chamoy apple was all the author needed to get hooked. Flickr hide caption

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Flickr

Customers at Puzzles Bakery & Café in Schenectady, N.Y. More than half the staff at the café has a developmental disability. Rhitu Chatterjee/NPR hide caption

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Rhitu Chatterjee/NPR

For People With Developmental Disabilities, Food Work Means More Self Reliance

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Pasta puttanesca is perhaps the most well-known dish among Lemony Snicket fans, although Count Olaf would have preferred roast beef. Kristen Hartke hide caption

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Kristen Hartke

The puffy taco with beef from Rays Drive-In in San Antonio is a standout for Sutter, but the year has just begun. San Antonio Express-News hide caption

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San Antonio Express-News

This Food Critic Will Take The Taco. Again. And Again. And Again.

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Helen Dahlke, a scientist from the University of California, Davis, stands in an almond orchard outside Modesto that's being deliberately flooded. This experiment is examining how flooding farmland in the winter can help replenish the state's depleted aquifers. Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis

As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground

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Marie-Antoine Carême began his hardscrabble life in Paris during the French Revolution, but eventually his penchant for design and his baking talent brought him fame and fortune. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia

David Fuller has been a dairy farmer since 1977. He gets about the same amount of money for milk these days he did when he started. Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio

Nonperishable food is restocked in Maggie Ballard's "blessing box" in Wichita, Kan., several times a day. Deborah Shaar/KMUW hide caption

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Deborah Shaar/KMUW

A New Type Of Food Pantry Is Sprouting In Yards Across America

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