A Starbucks in Santa Monica, Calif. With no other place to go, many of Los Angeles' homeless end up at the chain's outlets — to the consternation of some employees. Denise Taylor/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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How Starbucks Got Tangled Up In LA's Homelessness Crisis
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A customer receives a slice of pizza from the prepared food section of the new Whole Foods Market Inc. store in downtown Los Angeles. Prepared foods sold at supermarkets, big-box and convenience stores are a bigger and bigger portion of those companies' profits. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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What's For Dinner? The Options For A Fast Answer Multiply
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A platter of falafel, kafta, french fries and other fare at Al Ameer Restaurant in Dearborn, Mich. The Mediterranean eatery will be recognized by the James Beard Awards this year in the "American Classics" category. Edsel Little/Flickr hide caption

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Danny Cahill (left) won Season 8 of The Biggest Loser in 2009 by losing an amazing 239 pounds. He's pictured with at-home prize winner Rebecca Meyer. In the years since, Cahill has put back on more than 100 pounds, he told The New York Times. NBC via Getty Images hide caption

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'Biggest Loser' Lessons: Why The Body Makes It Hard To Keep Pounds Off
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The group's tour of Philadelphia's Italian Market includes a stop at Claudio's, a store that sells imported Italian fare. Brad Larrison for NewsWorks hide caption

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The American Egg Board brought you this photo, but does that mean it came from private industry or the government? Courtesy of The American Egg Board hide caption

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A waiter carries beers at the Theresienwiese fair grounds of the Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich, southern Germany, last September. For centuries, a German law has stipulated that beer can only be made from four ingredients. But as Germany embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Germany's Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?
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Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya (left) presents an employee with shares of the company on Tuesday at the Chobani plant in New Berlin, in upstate New York. Johannes Arlt hide caption

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Why Chobani Gave Employees A Financial Stake In Company's Future
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Cybil Preston, chief apiary inspector for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, does a training run with Mack: She sets up fake beehives and commands him to "find." He sniffs each of them to check for American foulbrood. He has been trained to sit to notify Preston if he detects the disease. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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The staple at legendary Prince's is fiery hot fried chicken, always served on white bread, with pickles. Danielle Atkins/Courtesy of Spring House Press hide caption

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How A Cheating Man Gave Rise To Nashville's Hot Chicken Craze
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Harriet Tubman, pictured between 1860 and 1875. The woman who will soon become the first African-American to grace an American currency note self-funded many of her heroic raids to save slaves by cooking. H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP hide caption

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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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