Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

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Rich Harlan prepares Coney hot dogs at his restaurant, Red Hots Coney Island, in Detroit. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Coney: The Hot Dog That Fueled Detroit's Middle-Class Dreams

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Marraqueta is often part of every meal in Chile. Many Chileans fondly remember simple childhood breakfasts of marraqueta with mashed avocado on top — a tradition that predates the current avocado toast craze. Eileen Smith for NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Aragvi

Dine Like A Soviet Spy: Old KGB Haunt Opens Its Doors Again

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Jennifer Gleason (left) and Alice Melendez, who's growing Hickory King heirloom corn on her farm to help Gleason make corn chips. Noah Adams/NPR hide caption

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From Farm To Distillery, Heirloom Corn Varieties Are Sweet Treasures

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The seed library maintained by the Jijak Foundation contains dozens of native varieties of corn, beans, tobacco, watermelon and ancient squash. Rebecca Williams/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Anti-Brexit supporters dressed as bananas protest outside a racecourse in York, England. "It is absolutely crazy that the EU is telling us what shape our bananas have got to be," says Brexit's foremost cheerleader, Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London, invoking one of the oldest and most persistent tall tales about EU bureaucracy. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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For decades, Nitza Villapol hosted Cocina al Minuto, a popular cooking show in Cuba. In the decades after Fidel Castro took power, she adapted her cooking, teaching Cubans how to make do without certain ingredients while instructing them in how to use once-eschewed produce and cuts of meat in new ways. Screenshot from YouTube hide caption

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The 'Turkey' apricot, a hand-colored engraving after a drawing by Augusta Innes Withers (1792-1869), from the first volume of John Lindley's Pomological Magazine (1827-1828). The Romans dubbed the apricot the "precious one." Poets praised its beauty. The conquering Arabs took it to the Mideast, where the luxurious fruit was exploited in sugary confections. The Royal Horticultural Society Diary/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor discuss the court's food traditions. RBG let us in on a secret: The reason she was not entirely awake at the State of the Union? She wasn't totally sober. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Pork roll or Taylor Ham? What you call it may depend on where you live in New Jersey. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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New Jerseyans Chew Over What To Call Their Favorite Pork Product

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Eddie Huang is a chef and restaurateur, a TV host and the author of two memoirs. Donald Traill/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chef Eddie Huang On Cultural Identity And 'Intestine Sticky Rice Hot Dog'

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Patricia Gallagher (from left), who first proposed the tasting; wine merchant Steven Spurrier; and influential French wine editor Odette Kahn. After the results were announced, Kahn is said to have demanded her scorecard back. "She wanted to make sure that the world didn't know what her scores were," says George Taber, the only journalist present that day. Courtesy of Bella Spurrier hide caption

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The Judgment Of Paris: The Blind Taste Test That Decanted The Wine World

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