This upland rice is a remarkable link between West Africa, the Gullah-Geechee sea islands of the American South, and the Merikin settlements of southern Trinidad. Courtesy of Francis Morean hide caption

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Courtesy of Francis Morean

Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

In "The Fish on My Plate," author and fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question "what fish should I eat that's good for me and good for the planet?" As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spent a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Courtesy of FRONTLINE hide caption

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Courtesy of FRONTLINE

Claire Stewart, author of As Long as We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts, says the white-frosted cake familiar today "is a fairly modern invention." Michael Skoglund/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Skoglund/Getty Images

On the weekend of April 8, the Czech Embassy in Washington, D.C., made mazanec as part of an Easter celebration. Courtesy of the Czech Embassy hide caption

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Courtesy of the Czech Embassy

The cupcakes above are patterned after simnel cake, also known as Judas cake. It is traditionally topped with 11 marzipan balls to represent Jesus' 12 apostles, minus Judas. H is for Home/Flickr hide caption

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H is for Home/Flickr

Most people in the world have never experienced the taste of the kind of tortillas Hilda Pastor makes using heirloom corn. That's because of the rise of mass-produced instant corn flour. Marisa Peñaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza/NPR

Joan Nathan, the author of 11 cookbooks, has sought out local Jewish food traditions as she's traveled the world. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR

A World Of Flavors In A Single Dish: How Jewish Food Spread Across The Globe

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Maamoul, a shortbread cookie stuffed with date paste or chopped walnuts or pistachios and dusted with powdered sugar, is the perfect reward after a month of fasting during Ramadan and Lent. These cookies are waiting to be baked. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

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Amy E. Robertson for NPR

To make matzo brei, crumble leftover matzo, soak it, drain it and beat it with an egg or two. Then, fry it up, scrambled or omelet-style. Tali Blankfeld/Flickr Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Tali Blankfeld/Flickr Editorial/Getty Images

American servicemen enjoy a hot cup of coffee at a Salvation Army hut in New York, circa 1918. During World War I, instant coffee was a key provision for soldiers on the front. They called it a "cup of George." FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Idan Cohen's grandmother's famous German layer cake. Idan's mom always said that the Israeli climate did not agree with this cake, but she made it anyway. Courtesy of Jewish Food Society hide caption

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Courtesy of Jewish Food Society

Dr. Marilyn Wong serves green papaya and pigs' feet soup, a Vietnamese dish believed to fortify new mothers. Grace Hwang Lynch for NPR hide caption

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Grace Hwang Lynch for NPR

There are many rituals associated with the Hindu Sindh holiday Cheti Chand, which falls on March 29 this year. One that continues to hold meaning for the author is the consumption of tahri, or sweet rice, during langar, the communal meal at the end of the celebration. Pooja Makhijani for NPR hide caption

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Pooja Makhijani for NPR

In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Last Friday night, the Berlin bookstore Shakespeare and Sons hosted a Sabbath dinner as part of the pre-kickoff activities for Nosh Berlin, the German capital's first Jewish food festival. Guests at the bookstore included many non-Jewish Germans who purchased tickets. Veronica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Veronica Zaragovia for NPR

Liberty Orchards in Cashmere, Wash., which was founded by two Armenian immigrants, still makes Aplets & Cotlets, a variation of Turkish delight that includes apples, apricots and walnuts. Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc.

Nowruz, the Persian New Year, is a celebration of the start of spring marked through large parts of the Middle East and Central Asia. Above, a Nowruz haftseen table, laden with seven items meant to symbolize rebirth or renewal. creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto