"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Eskalis/NPR

A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

Mike McCloskey, his cousin Manuel Perez (left), and one of their co-workers on a beach at the edge of their new farm in Puerto Rico. McCloskey and Perez played on this beach as children. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Chasing A Dream Built On Dairy, This Master Of Milk Came Home

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Arctic Apples are genetically engineered to produce less of the enzyme that turns sliced apples brown. Courtesy Okanagan Specialty Fruits hide caption

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Courtesy Okanagan Specialty Fruits

Tom Coleman, who manages more than 8,000 acres of pistachio trees across California, is worried that warmer temperatures will affect his crops. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Farmers and chefs looking for their perfect match at Bluejacket, a restaurant and brewery in Washington, D.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

'Speed Dating' For Farmers And Chefs: ISO A Perfect Local-Food Match

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture

David Fuller has been a dairy farmer since 1977. He gets about the same amount of money for milk these days he did when he started. Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio

A vaquita caught as by-catch in Baja California, Mexico. Accidental entanglement in fishing gear is one of the biggest threat to this species, which is down to only 60 animals. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Natalie Arroyo is a senior "Aggie," one of 600 New York City public school students enrolled in a specialized, four-year agriculture program at John Bowne High School in Queens. She plans to become an agriculture educator after college. Lela Nargi for NPR hide caption

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Lela Nargi for NPR

Tom Conner, the current owner of Conner Bottling Works, is part of the fourth generation of the family-owned business. Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio
Dan Charles/NPR

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

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Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Portland's Gulf of Maine Research Institute has designed a trawl net that aims to target species that can still be profitable while avoiding cod. Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute

When they are gorging themselves, the maggots' metabolic heat can reach 130 degrees. Luke Runyon/KUNC and Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Hamlin oranges are washed, graded and packed for shipment at the Dundee Citrus Growers Association packing house in Lake Hamilton, Florida. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

After A Sour Decade, Florida Citrus May Be Near A Comeback

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