A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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A beer flight from New District Brewing Co. Courtesy of New District Brewing Co. hide caption

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Amid Craft Brewery Boom, Some Worry About A Bubble — But Most Just Fear Foam

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Perdue will study the effects of features such as perches in chicken houses. It hopes to double the activity levels of its chickens in the next three years. Business Wire hide caption

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In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

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The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Inside one of Mastronardi Produce Sunset Grown's greenhouses, tomato vines hang on lines that can be adjusted so that the tomatoes are always at a height that's convenient for harvesting. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How Canada Became A Greenhouse Superpower

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A farmer handles a bag of Syngenta's bean seeds on a farm near Johannesburg, South Africa. Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Lawmakers Scrutinize China's Bid To Buy Agrichemical Giant Syngenta

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Between January and March, beekeepers send millions of hives to California to pollinate almond trees. A sign in this almond orchard warns it is patrolled — a measure to combat rising beehive thefts. Barbara Rich/Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Barker of Maine Fresh Sea Farms checks a seaweed line. People have foraged wild seaweed off the Eastern Seaboard for centuries. But now a much more active effort to grow seaweed in the U.S. is afoot. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Seaweed On Your Dinner Plate: The Next Kale Could Be Kelp

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Tomatoes from Canada, Mexico and Florida Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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The Search For Tastier Supermarket Tomatoes: A Tale In 3 Acts

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Furloughed Polar workers picket outside Polar's Caracas brewery, which shut down in April. They are protesting against the government, which has impeded Polar's ability to import barley. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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Venezuela Is Running Out Of Beer Amid Severe Economic Crisis

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Andrew Heineman's twin brother, Marcus, pulls a cultivator across a different field where they will plant seed corn this year, another alternative they selected when the price of corn started to fall and a new seed corn plant opened up nearby. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Willard Middle School students chop carrots for a meal they will sell through Josephine. Teresa Chin/Youth Radio hide caption

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Why One Startup Is Offering Meals Made By Home Cooks And Middle-Schoolers

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Guy Davies, an inspector of the Florida Division of Plant Industry, shows an orange that is showing signs of "citrus greening." The disease is caused by a bacterium carried by the Asian citrus psyllid. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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After Seattle's new minimum wage law took effect last April, Ivar's Seafood Restaurants announced it would immediately increase its prices by about 21 percent, eliminate tipping and pay all its hourly workers $15 per hour. Several other restaurants are adopting a no-tip policy to equalize the pay gap among employees, but many have gone back on that move. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Why Restaurants Are Ditching The Switch To No Tipping

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Seattle chef Renee Erickson won the 2016 James Beard Award as best chef in the Northwest. She employs 100 people at her restaurant group. Jim Henkens/Here & Now hide caption

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