Teresa, 31, worked at a pork processing plant in Nebraska for five years until injuries to her shoulder forced her to quit. She still has pain and can only work part-time. Brian Seifferlein/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Working 'The Chain,' Slaughterhouse Workers Face Lifelong Injuries

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Greta Horner holds a photo of her and her husband Ed taken a few months before he died. Dan Boyce/Rocky Mountain PBS for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Fines For Meat Industry's Safety Problems Are 'Embarrassingly Low'

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Pictured in the corn fields of the student-managed farm she helped run this summer, Taryn Riediger is an aspiring farmer. After graduating, she expects to work livestock for someone else before possibly returning to her family's farm. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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To protest against the falling prices of dairy and meat, farmers pour liters of milk in front of a prefecture in northwestern France in January. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The farm's green rolling hills are covered with olive, oak, fruit and nut trees, which provide ample food for migrating geese. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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This Spanish Farm Makes Foie Gras Without Force-Feeding

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Starting this week, Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, says it will start piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its Florida stores. Courtesy of Wal-Mart hide caption

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Congress has passed a bill that will require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody's Super Happy About It

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Various cereal options available at Kellogg's NYC cereal bar. The restaurant encourages experimentation, part of the company's strategy to challenge the conception of cereal as being only a breakfast food. Christopher Lane/Courtesy of Kellogg's hide caption

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A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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A beer flight from New District Brewing Co. Courtesy of New District Brewing Co. hide caption

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Amid Craft Brewery Boom, Some Worry About A Bubble — But Most Just Fear Foam

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Perdue will study the effects of features such as perches in chicken houses. It hopes to double the activity levels of its chickens in the next three years. Business Wire hide caption

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In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

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The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Inside one of Mastronardi Produce Sunset Grown's greenhouses, tomato vines hang on lines that can be adjusted so that the tomatoes are always at a height that's convenient for harvesting. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How Canada Became A Greenhouse Superpower

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A farmer handles a bag of Syngenta's bean seeds on a farm near Johannesburg, South Africa. Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Lawmakers Scrutinize China's Bid To Buy Agrichemical Giant Syngenta

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