Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.

Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

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Courtesy of Cacao de Origen

Confusion over "sell by" and "use by" dates is one big reason why billions of tons of food are tossed each year. A new global initiative of food giants, including Amazon, Walmart and Nestle, aims to tackle that. mrtom-uk//iStockphoto hide caption

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mrtom-uk//iStockphoto

The organic industry is suing the government, demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture implement new rules that require organic egg producers to give their chickens more space to roam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Organic Industry Sues USDA To Push For Animal Welfare Rules

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Guilvinec port Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Brexit Leaves French Fishermen On The Hook

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In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

Rice farmer John Gaulding wades through the roughly 8 inches of water still filling his fields in rural Hamshire, Texas. At its worst, he says, the water was as high as 30-36 inches. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Texas Farmers Suffer Extensive Crop Losses In Wake Of Harvey

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Tuna are arranged prior to the first auction of the year at Tsukiji Fish Market in Tokyo, Japan. The new agreement to protect Pacific bluefin tuna is aimed at putting the species on a path to recovery by setting sliding catch limits. The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images

Washington has eight Atlantic salmon net pens. There are two types: commercial net pens for raising Atlantic salmon and enhancement net pens for wild salmon that will eventually be released. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

The destructive diamondback moth has spread across the world and mutated to become immune to each new chemical pesticide designed to slay it. Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images

Farmer Kevin Sullivan put solar panels on a portion of his property in Suffield, Conn. Patrick Skahill/WNPR hide caption

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Patrick Skahill/WNPR

For New England Farmers Looking To Make Ends Meet, The Sun Provides A Harvest

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Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Anhydrous ammonia tanks in a newly planted wheat field. Walmart has promised big cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases. To meet that goal, though, the giant retailer may have to persuade farmers to use less fertilizer. It won't be easy. TheBusman/Getty Images hide caption

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TheBusman/Getty Images

Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms?

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During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. Scientists are waiting to see how crops and animals react. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Applebee's recently announced it will close more than 130 restaurants by the end of the year, after rebranding efforts failed to attract millennials. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Applebee's Gives Up On Millennials After Failed Rebranding Efforts

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A Gelbvieh cow and her calf on a ranch in Paradise Valley, Mont. From Montana cattle ranchers to Florida tomato growers, some bruised by NAFTA think it has favored agribusiness over small-scale farms, lowered environmental standards and made it harder to compete against cheaper imports. William Campbell/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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William Campbell/Corbis/Getty Images

The teal blue area along the Louisiana coastline represents a "dead zone" of oxygen-depleted water. Resulting from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi River, it can potentially hurt fisheries. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen

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Maine's lobster fleet has a growing number of women who, like Sadie Samuels, are running their own boats, and busting stereotypes along the way. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

More Women Move Into Maine's Rough And Risky World Of Lobstering

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Farmer Wendy Johnson markets hogs, chickens, eggs and seasonal turkeys. She also grows organic row crops at Joia Food Farm near Charles City, Iowa. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media