A cow is milked at a dairy farm in Granby, Quebec, last month. President Trump recently accused Canada of unfairly blocking imports of milk from the U.S. He was taking aim at a Canadian system that defiantly rejects the free market and protects small farmers. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Canadian Dairy Farmers Escape The Global Milk Glut

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Poultry workers at major U.S. meat-processing plants are highly susceptible to repetitive-motion injuries, denied bathroom breaks and are most often immigrants and refugees. Earl Dotter/Oxfam hide caption

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Earl Dotter/Oxfam

The family-owned Wholesum Harvest had to meet a checklist of more than 300 standards — including many worker protections — to become the first American farm certified by Fair Trade USA. Workers at its Nogales, Ariz., tomato farm recently received a check for more than $30,000 — workers will collectively decide how to spend it. Courtesy of Wholesum Harvest hide caption

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Courtesy of Wholesum Harvest

A tart cherry orchard in Michigan. Warmer days in early spring and erratic spring weather have hurt yields in recent years. Still, cherry growers are reluctant to discuss the role of climate change. Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

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A fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico. Catch share programs allot fishermen a portion of the catch in advance, in hopes of keeping them from racing each other to sea, sometimes in risky weather. These programs are controversial. They also work, a new study finds. Courtesy of John Rae hide caption

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Courtesy of John Rae

Bone broth has become so popular these days that the bones used to make it are getting harder — and more expensive — for broth retailers to source. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

A receipt from Centre Street Cafe in Jamaica Plain, Mass., includes a 3 percent "hospitality administration fee," which comes out to 39 cents on $13 of food sales. The entire fee goes to nontipped employees in the kitchen. Simón Rios/WBUR hide caption

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Simón Rios/WBUR

Restaurants Cook Up A New Way To Pay Kitchen Staff More: A Cut Of Sales

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Matt Kern harvests wild bull kelp for salsa that he and his partner, Lisa Heifetz, are selling as part of his new business. Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz

Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. The sign, in English and Spanish, warns that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk

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Demand for domestic tea is so strong that Minto Island Tea Co. continues expanding production. Here, Camellia sinensis is planted on the Salem, Ore., farm. It takes three years for tea plants to mature for harvest. Courtesy of Minto Island Tea Co. hide caption

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Courtesy of Minto Island Tea Co.

Liberty Orchards in Cashmere, Wash., which was founded by two Armenian immigrants, still makes Aplets & Cotlets, a variation of Turkish delight that includes apples, apricots and walnuts. Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc.

Cows graze at Dharma Lea Farm in Sharon Springs, N.Y. Advocates of grass-grazing cattle say it's better for the environment and the animals. But there's another upside: Grass-fed meat and dairy fetch a premium that can help small farms stay viable. Courtesy of Maple Hill Creamery hide caption

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Courtesy of Maple Hill Creamery

Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Green shoots of cereal rye, a popular cover crop, emerge in a field where corn was recently harvested in Iowa. The grass will go dormant in winter, then resume growing in the spring. Less than three percent of corn fields in the state have cover crops. Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa hide caption

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Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa

Last May, members of the Avaaz civic organization dressed as crop-sprayers in Brussels to protest the European Commission's plans to re-license glyphosate, the popular weed-killer sold by Monsanto under the brand name Roundup. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

Minara Begum (left) and her sister, Rajna Begum, served coconut Mishti (sweets) at the first Bandhu Gardens pop-up at Rose's Fine Food last July. Courtesy of Andrew Miller hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Miller

National Trade Council head Peter Navarro (right) and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (center) await President Trump's signing executive orders at the White House on Jan. 23. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Adviser's Warning About Food Supply Takeover Met With Skepticism

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Grass strips alongside streams, like this one in the Lac qui Parle River watershed of Minnesota, can help to reduce fertilizer runoff from fields. MN Pollution Control Agency/Flickr hide caption

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MN Pollution Control Agency/Flickr

Farmers Fight Environmental Regulations

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Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences students Liz Hada, left, and Melissa Garcia Rodriguez say they have experienced racial tension in some of their classes, despite feeling generally welcomed by most students and faculty. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media