A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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Sweet potato evangelist Maria Isabel Andrade drives around Mozambique in her orange Toyota Land Cruiser in 2012. She is one of four researchers honored with the World Food Prize for promoting the crop to combat malnutrition. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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An illustration shows spikes of different types of wheat: (1) Polish wheat (2) Club wheat (3) Common bread wheat (4) Poulard wheat (5) Durum wheat (6) Spelt (7) Emmer (8) Einkorn. The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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The new brewery at Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. The school now teaches the art and science of brewing, an elective course. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Fermentation Fervor: Here's How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

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Coffee gets the all-clear from the World Health Organization's cancer research agency. Rob MacEwen/Flickr hide caption

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Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

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In her new book, neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt tackles why traditional diets don't work for many people, and often leave the dieter worse off than before. PM Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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A 1950s poster from the National Dairy Council. Ads like these helped fuel the rise of cereal as a breakfast staple. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Breakfast Backtrack: Maybe Skipping The Morning Meal Isn't So Bad

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The maker of Kind bars — which contain almonds and other nuts — pushed back against an FDA complaint about its use of the phrase "healthy and tasty." The FDA is now reviewing its definition of "healthy" as used on food labels. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Why The FDA Is Re-Evaluating The Nutty Definition Of 'Healthy' Food

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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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