Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Over three years, a campaign urged Howard County, Md., residents to pare back on sugary drinks — through ads, social media, health counseling and changes to what vending machines sold. And it worked. Adrian Burke/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating too much bacon, or too few whole grains, nuts and seeds, can influence your risk of death from heart disease. Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are linked to diet. Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images hide caption

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An increasing number of overweight Americans have lost the motivation to diet. enisaksoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Dieting Passe? Study Finds Fewer Overweight People Try To Lose Weight

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New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some breast cancer survivors, soy consumption was found to be tied to longer life. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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For Breast Cancer Survivors, Eating Soy Tied To A Longevity Boost

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As more research suggests some degree of dietary cholesterol is harmless, if not healthy, the egg's reputation is slowly returning. Yet some experts worry the science is being misinterpreted and spun. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Concerns about mercury contamination have led many pregnant women to under-consume seafood. So the FDA issued a new chart explaining what to eat and what to avoid. But critics say it muddles matters. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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Which eating plan will work with your lifestyle and help you lose weight? U.S.News & World Report has plenty of advice with its latest diet rankings. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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How Much Is Too Much? New Study Casts Doubts On Sugar Guidelines

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Seaweed farms like this one on Nusa Lembongan Island, in Indonesia, are the main sources of carrageenan. Paul Kennedy/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image hide caption

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Carrageenan Backlash: Food Firms Are Ousting A Popular Additive

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Despite assumptions that peanut, egg and other allergies are becoming more common in the U.S., experts say they just don't know. One challenge: Symptoms can be misinterpreted and diagnosis isn't easy. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Are Food Allergies On The Rise? Experts Say They Don't Know

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Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in San Francisco, Calif. The city is one of three in California, and four in the U.S., that passed taxes on sodas and other sugary drinks in Tuesday's election. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Souring On Sweet? Voters In 4 Cities Pass Soda Tax Measures

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Two people at a food pantry in Portland, Maine, choose items from a display of produce. Several food banks around the country have been trying something new to get people to choose healthier foods. And it's working. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Food Pantries Try Nutritional Nudging To Encourage Good Food Choices

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Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in 2014 in San Francisco. The city is one of several in California that have a soda tax on the ballot this November. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Trick Or Treat? Critics Blast Big Soda's Efforts To Fend Off Taxes

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Diet Coke for sale in a Chinese supermarket. A new World Health Organization report recommends that nations adopt fiscal policies, including taxes, that raise the retail price of sugary drinks to fend off obesity and diabetes — and the health care costs that go with them. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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An Indian pedestrian checks his mobile phone in front of an advertisement for a burger of a fast-food giant in Mumbai, India. Fast food and highly processed foods and sodas are increasingly becoming more popular around the world, one of the main reasons for increasing rates of overweight and obesity. Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Last year, the Food and Drug Administration told the maker of Kind bars that some of its nut-filled snacks couldn't be labeled as "healthy." Now the agency is rethinking what healthy means, amid evolving science on fat and sugar. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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FDA Is Redefining The Term 'Healthy' On Food Labels

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Chill Out: Stress Can Override Benefits Of Healthful Eating

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