Food For Thought : The Salt There's never been more interest in food and where it comes from and how it gets to your plate. This is the place for science, politics and the controversial topics that make you go "hmm."

Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

toggle caption
Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

Dorothy Boddie runs the outreach ministry at Allen Chapel AME, one of the Capital Area Food Bank's nonprofit partners. The D.C.-area food bank is part of a growing trend to move toward healthier options in food assistance, because many in the population it serves suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes. Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement. Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

Greg Gatscher, left, and his son, Evan, prepare the house for Hurricane Irma. Little did they know these metal shutters would later become a cooktop. Tara Gatscher hide caption

toggle caption
Tara Gatscher

Mini Market is a bodega in Ridgewood, Queens, that sits on the corner of Seneca Avenue and Woodbine Street. Writer Angely Mercado says these stores aren't just about convenience — they feed the spirit of a community. Angely Mercado hide caption

toggle caption
Angely Mercado

Chef Douglas McMaster is committed to a "zero waste" ethos in his restaurants. Here, he plates up his creations at Silo, his flagship restaurant, in Brighton, England, about an hour south of London. Xavier Buendia/Courtesy of Doug McMaster hide caption

toggle caption
Xavier Buendia/Courtesy of Doug McMaster

Tennesee Nydegger-Sandidge (left) and Holly Hook try chowing down on some crickets. "People should eat them because they're good for the planet," says Tennessee. Melissa Banigan hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Banigan

At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Solomon/OPB

The organic industry is suing the government, demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture implement new rules that require organic egg producers to give their chickens more space to roam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP

Organic Industry Sues USDA To Push For Animal Welfare Rules

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550607440/550607441" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Guilvinec port Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Brexit Leaves French Fishermen On The Hook

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548963126/550218528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548926054/550058429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Express/Getty Images

Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548715416/549250161" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rice farmer John Gaulding wades through the roughly 8 inches of water still filling his fields in rural Hamshire, Texas. At its worst, he says, the water was as high as 30-36 inches. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carrie Kahn/NPR

Texas Farmers Suffer Extensive Crop Losses In Wake Of Harvey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548985185/548985186" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Uzzell at work in the kitchen at Marcel's. Uzzell has a written list of daily tasks from chef and owner Robert Wiedmaier at his station, and his ever-present notepad and pencil on the shelf above serves as communication tools for more specific instructions. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kristen Hartke for NPR

Aboard the fishing vessel Marathon, Nicholas Cooke (left) and Nathan Cultee unload 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container in Bellingham, Wash. Megan Farmer/KUOW hide caption

toggle caption
Megan Farmer/KUOW

Salmon Fisher: Spill Is Dangerous And 'We Shouldn't Have To Deal With It'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547361033/547373412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Washington has eight Atlantic salmon net pens. There are two types: commercial net pens for raising Atlantic salmon and enhancement net pens for wild salmon that will eventually be released. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert F. Bukaty/AP