Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

A street vendor makes huaraches and quesadillas on the sidewalk in the piñata district in Los Angeles. LA is the only major U.S. city where selling food on the sidewalk is illegal. President Trump's immigration policies have pushed the city council to change the law. But the devil is in the details. Camellia Tse for NPR hide caption

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Camellia Tse for NPR

Chef José Andrés will shutter five of his restaurants on Thursday as part of a boycott in response to President Trump's immigration policies. Beth J. Harpaz/AP hide caption

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Beth J. Harpaz/AP

Chef José Andrés To Close Restaurants For The 'Day Without Immigrants'

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images

Cattle grazing in southwestern Colombia. This combination of nutritious grasses and trees, known as silvopastoralism, can increase farm production and aid the environment. Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT hide caption

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Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT

New York City's Blue Hill restaurant is the biggest buyer of "Habanadas," a habanero bred to be heatless, so the focus is on its melon-like flavor. Courtesy of Blue Hill hide caption

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Courtesy of Blue Hill

At Saxon + Parole, a New York City restaurant, chef Brad Farmerie serves up the Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger that sizzles, smells and even bleeds like the real thing. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Saving The Planet, One Burger At A Time: This Juicy Patty Is Meat-Free

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American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Ill. A thriving American Indian city that rose to prominence after A.D. 900 owing to successful maize farming, it may have collapsed because of changing climate. Michael Dolan/Flickr hide caption

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Michael Dolan/Flickr

At Everyman Espresso in New York City's East Village, customers were greeted with a sign announcing a fundraiser to help defend immigrants. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Amid Travel Ban Debate, Chefs And Food Brands Take A Stand On Immigration

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This wild hog from Hawaii was raised at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo. Feral pigs in the wild tend to eat anything containing a calorie — from rows of corn to sea turtle eggs, to baby deer and goats. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Scientists Get Down And Dirty With DNA To Track Wild Pigs

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A still from Budweiser's Super Bowl ad tells the story of one of Budweiser's founders. Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR