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A cabbage butterfly caterpillar. For tens of millions of years, these critters have been in an evolutionary arms race with plants they munch on. The end result: "mustard oil bombs" that also explode with flavor when we humans harness them to make condiments. Courtesy of Roger Meissen/Bond LSC hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Roger Meissen/Bond LSC

Bill McKelvey created Grow Well Missouri with a five-year grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to help create more access to produce — and the health benefits that come with growing it yourself. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

itoggle caption Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.) Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc.

The Smuttynose Towle Farm brewery in Hampton, N.H., has an invisible but tight envelope that keeps the interior temperature consistently cool or warm, prevents energy loss and ultimately saves money. Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company

Before blight decimated most of the American chestnut trees in the U.S., one of the great autumn pastimes was collecting the nuts and transforming them into pan-fried bread, porridge, pickles, preserves or cream pie. Timothy Van Vliet/Wikipedia hide caption

itoggle caption Timothy Van Vliet/Wikipedia

Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices. Courtesy of Imperfect Produce hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

Cesar Zuniga, operations manager at the Salinas Valley municipal dump in California, points to salad greens that still have two weeks before their sell-by date. "Some loads ... look very fresh," Zuniga says. "We question, wow, why is this being tossed?" Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Allison Aubrey/NPR

Pacific bluefin tuna for sale for $2.99 per pound at the fish market in San Diego. That shockingly low price does not reflect the deeply threatened state of the bluefin population. Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR

A juvenile chimpanzee uses a leaf sponge to drink palm wine in Bossou, Guinea. Gaku Ohashi/Chubu University, Japan, and Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University, Japan hide caption

itoggle caption Gaku Ohashi/Chubu University, Japan, and Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University, Japan

This Alaskan cod taco with pickled radish salsa is one of several drought-friendly recipes that chef Nathan Lyon and his culinary manager, Sarah Forman, have cooked up. Courtesy of Sarah Forman hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sarah Forman

The new lunch plates are made from recycled newsprint and are easier for kids to hold, says Eric Goldstein, chairman of the Urban School Food Alliance. Courtesy of NRDC hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of NRDC

Wal-Mart employee Dayngel Fernandez stocks shelves in the produce department of a Miami store in February. Activists say the company's recent corporate policy changes don't address systemic labor and environmental problems. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Noemi Sosa shops at Daily Table, a nonprofit supermarket in Dorchester, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

itoggle caption Jesse Costa/WBUR

A row of newly planted organic tomatoes on April 23, 2015 in Firebaugh, Calif. Some farmers are moving tomato production to the north of the state where water supplies are better. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Kanzi the bonobo (a species closely related to chimps) holds a pan of vegetables he cooked at the Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa, November 2011. Kanzi was taught to cook. However, a new study is the first to show that animals can acquire a cooking-like skill on their own. Laurentiu Garofeanu/Barcroft Media /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Laurentiu Garofeanu/Barcroft Media /Landov

An African-American Army cook at work in City Point, Va., sometime between 1860 and 1865. Food played a critical role in determining the outcome of the Civil War. Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Library of Congress