Surplus corn is piled outside a storage silo in Paoli, Colo. Do federal farm subsidies encourage the production — and perhaps overconsumption — of things that we're told to eat less of, like high fructose corn syrup or meat produced from livestock raised on subsidized grains? Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Workers sort potatoes in the field, collecting small and large ones in different buckets. Each bucket weighs 30 pounds or so. A worker will shoulder that bucket and dump it into a flatbed truck hundreds of times each day. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

For Pickers, Blueberries Mean Easier Labor But More Upheaval

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Rich Harlan prepares Coney hot dogs at his restaurant, Red Hots Coney Island, in Detroit. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Coney: The Hot Dog That Fueled Detroit's Middle-Class Dreams

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Various cereal options available at Kellogg's NYC cereal bar. The restaurant encourages experimentation, part of the company's strategy to challenge the conception of cereal as being only a breakfast food. Christopher Lane/Courtesy of Kellogg's hide caption

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The dining room for Wolvesmouth: Taxa, a pop-up dining experience as art installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary location. Myles Pettengill/Courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles hide caption

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At LA's MOCA, A Celebrated Chef Serves Up Dinner As Art Installation

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French chef Stephane Jégo (left) poses with Syrian refugee chef Mohammad El Khaldy before the Refugees Food Festival held in Paris in June. Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Paris, Where Food Is King, Refugee Chefs Show What They Have To Offer

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Daal — yellow, red, brown or black — is a staple across India. It is often described, inadequately, I think, as lentil soup. Except it's so much more. Arash James Iravan/Getty Images hide caption

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The Senate on Thursday approved a measure that would require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the Senate bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods has taken a high-tech approach to creating a plant-based burger that smells and tastes like real meat. At the company's headquarters in Redwood City, Calif., chef Traci Des Jardins served the Impossible Burger (pictured uncooked) with vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, mashed avocado, caramelized onions, chopped cornichon, tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun. Maggie Carson Jurow hide caption

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