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Denmark Taxes Butter And Fat, But Will It Work?

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Denmark Taxes Butter And Fat, But Will It Work?

Denmark Taxes Butter And Fat, But Will It Work?

Denmark Taxes Butter And Fat, But Will It Work?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141014592/141014496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Butter - it's going to cost you in Denmark.

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Mark Jackson/iStockphoto.com

Butter - it's going to cost you in Denmark.

Mark Jackson/iStockphoto.com

Denmark, the land of luscious lardy pork ribs and those famous blue butter cookie tins, is not known for having a major obesity problem. In fact, Danes are among the thinnest people in Europe and beyond. (Most obese? Us. About one-third of us. Us — as in people of the U.S.)

So when the tiny Scandinavian country announced it would be imposing a 16 Kroner (about $3 U.S.) tax on every kilogram of saturated fat as a way to discourage poor eating habits and raise revenue, we were left scratching our heads.

How's that going to work?

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