Must Reads : The Two-Way Some stories are just too weird, too funny or too sad to ignore. They may not be "serious news," but are so fascinating you must read them. NPR correspondents are on the watch for such tales. We pass along the best, from NPR and other news outlets.

Matthew Rockloff and Nancy Greer give their acceptance speech after winning the Ig Nobel Economics Prize during ceremonies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. The pair won for their experiments to see how contact with a live crocodile affects a person's willingness to gamble. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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The 130-ton fatberg formed underneath London's Whitechapel area and is said to be among the largest on record. Thames Water says the "rock-solid" mass is composed of cooking fat and wet wipes. AP hide caption

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AP

Naruto, a macaque, took this self-portrait in 2011 with a camera owned by photographer David Slater. The photo has been the subject of a years-long copyright battle. David Slater via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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David Slater via Wikimedia Commons

A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption

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Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont

NASA's Cassini probe has orbited Saturn for over a decade. This Friday, scientists will steer it into the gas giant's atmosphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Cassini Spacecraft Prepares For A Fiery Farewell In Saturn's Atmosphere

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Nurse Alex Wubbels (right) displays video frame grabs of herself being taken into custody while her attorney, Karra Porter, looks on during an interview Friday. Wubbels was arrested after she told a police detective it was against hospital policy to conduct a blood draw from an unconscious patient without a warrant. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

An orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, lives in symbiosis with a host anemone on the Great Barrier Reef. Alejandro Usobiaga/Scientific Reports hide caption

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Alejandro Usobiaga/Scientific Reports

Locals have been tweeting photos of fire ant colonies drifting aimlessly in the floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey. Juan DeLeon/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan DeLeon/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

A photo provided by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania shows an Aetna mailer in which a reference to HIV medication is partly visible though the envelope window. AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania hide caption

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AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania