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Bomb Plot Foiled; Obama & Cheney To Speak; More Money For GMAC?

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Bomb Plot Foiled; Obama & Cheney To Speak; More Money For GMAC?

Bomb Plot Foiled; Obama & Cheney To Speak; More Money For GMAC?

Good morning.

Last night, authorities in New York announced they had arrested four men on charges of plotting to bomb two Jewish sites in The Bronx and shoot surface-to-air guided missiles at military aircraft landing or taking off at the New York Air National Base in Newburgh, N.Y., about 60 miles north of New York City.

A short time ago, NPR's David Greene told Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep that it's not known yet how serious the plot was — but that FBI officials say the men had planted what they thought were bombs (the bombs weren't real; a tip had led the FBI to the men and the weapons were fakes):

Bomb Plot Foiled; Obama & Cheney To Speak; More Money For GMAC?

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The New York Times has posted a copy of the criminal complaint here.

That's one of the stories likely to get plenty of attention today. Also sure to dominate the news are the speeches being delivered this morning by President Barack Obama and former vice president Dick Cheney.

At 10:10 a.m. ET, the president is due to speak about national security and again lay out the reasons why he believes his administration's reversal of many Bush-era policies on interrogation will make the United States safer. He's also expected to address the controversial issue of what to do with those being held in detention at Guanantamo Bay, Cuba. Obama will be at the National Archives

Then, at 10:30 a.m. ET., Cheney speaks at the American Enterprise Institute. He's expected, again, to say that Obama's policies have made the nation less safe.

We're planning to live-blog both addresses.

In the meantime, on Morning Edition today NPR's Jackie Northam reported about what it's like at the Guantanamo detention center:

Bomb Plot Foiled; Obama & Cheney To Speak; More Money For GMAC?

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What other stories are making headlines?

Los Angeles Times — "California Braces For Brutal Budget Cuts": "Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and lawmakers scrambled Wednesday to avert a financial meltdown, and public officials across California braced for annihilating cuts on the day after voters trounced their leaders' rescue plan for the state. Within two hours of returning from Washington, D.C., the governor huddled behind closed doors with Democratic and Republican legislative leaders to grapple with a projected $21.3-billion budget shortfall for the coming fiscal year and stop state government from running out of money by July."

The Wall Street Journal (subscription required) — "GM Finance Arm To Get A Fresh Bailout": "The Treasury Department is poised to inject more than $7 billion into GMAC LLC, the first installment of a new government aid package that could reach $14 billion, according to people familiar with the matter."

The Star Tribune — Mother And Son With Cancer May Be Headed For Mexico: "Colleen Hauser and her 13-year-old son Daniel, on the run from court-ordered cancer treatment, were seen in southern California on Tuesday morning, Brown County Sheriff Rich Hoffmann said Wednesday night. At a hastily assembled news conference, Hoffmann said that the pair was apparently en route to Mexico for an alternative medical treatment to chemotherapy and that he notified the FBI and the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which agreed to assist in finding and detaining them. The two disappeared from southern Minnesota on Monday evening and failed to show up for a court hearing here on Tuesday.

And finally, for those who someone missed this stunning news but still want to know what happened:

Lambert, left, and Allen as they waited to hear who had won. Evans Vestal Ward/AP hide caption

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Evans Vestal Ward/AP

This year's American Idol competition ended, as NPR's Neda Ulaby puts it, with "an absolute upset."

Kris Allen, who Neda describes as a "sweetly sincere former missionary from Arkansas," beat glam rocker Adam Lambert, who had all-but been declared the winner by almost all the Idol experts.

Even Allen seemed shocked. "Adam deserves this, I'm sorry I don't even know what to feel right now," he said on hearing the news.

Contributing: Chinita Anderson of Morning Edition.